Page Summary

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags

travels

Aug. 20th, 2017 05:28 pm
alatefeline: Painting of a cat asleep on a book. (Default)
[personal profile] alatefeline
Went on an overnight trip thing Fri-Sat.

We camped! In a tent! That I pitched! At the beach!!!

Back. Today am very tired, not feel great today; restaurants are dangerous.

Tomorrow is Eclipse Day. Need to go very early because everyone will be go place do thing!

Should repack car. Keep going flat instead. Flat cat. Mrrrr... zzzz...

The truth has got its boots on

Aug. 20th, 2017 04:43 pm
elf: Computer chip with location dot (You Are Here)
[personal profile] elf
A scientific breakdown of the errors in Damore's manifesto - Metafilter discussed Damore's memo at length, until someone said, "I could write something about how wrong he is on all his biology claims," and people threw money at her Patreon until that happened.

It's terrific. It's also long and detailed and extensively cited, absolutely intended for quoting during future discussions where someone claims that the pay gap or glass ceiling or low representation of women in tech is caused by "biology."

She goes over his academic background, his argument methodology, and the actual science related to his claims, which - surprise surprise - involve incredible twists of misunderstanding, or cherry-picking data, or assuming that tests for personality traits can be used to confirm brain chemistry difference.
Sample excerpt inside the cut )

Sunday Yardening

Aug. 20th, 2017 06:08 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is sunny and hot, ugh.  I made it out to water plants and pick a pepper for Doug's supper. 

Poem: "To Appreciate Small Victories"

Aug. 20th, 2017 02:01 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is spillover from the March 7, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] kyleri, [livejournal.com profile] rix_scaedu, and [personal profile] sweet_sparrow. It also fills the "anxiety" square in my 3-1-17 card for the Disability Bingo fest. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Shiv thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Warning: This poem contains some intense topics. Highlight to read the warnings. It features prison inmates, group therapy, a show soup with some goat features including syndactyly and prey instincts, references to adaptive equipment, vulgar and intrusive talk, spitball leading to a prey reaction, refusal to apologize, speciesist language, discussion of disabilities, adoption issues, learning to compensate for a lost hand, and other challenges. If these are sensitive issues for you, please consider your tastes and headspace before reading onward.

Read more... )
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Demands and Decisions
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 6 of 6
word count (story only): 1233


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and the Road Trip arc, this is where Joshua's brain finally goes 'tilt,' but while there is tension, several good things develop as a result. ::


:: This story is sponsored by Callibr8, and she knows why! ::




“Your fellow officer seemed to treat it as a serious problem, as well. Will that be enough to instigate a change in leadership?” Il Dottore asked.

Joshua took a deeper breath than before, not quite sighing. “Almost certainly. The only question is how long it will take to name the next Chief.” He met the Italian's gaze. “Thank you. I don't feel like I'm going to shake out of my skin any longer.” He smiled, his shoulders tipping forward as he got ready to stand up.

The hand on his wrist tightened faintly. “Rest. There is more time to make plans, there is more time to help your son. Right now, simply be.”

“I've got a present for G stashed at the place where we stayed, called the Bird's Nest. It might be a good place for us to spend a few days, and hopefully Agent Tamsen can retrieve Isobel's mother, instead of taking Isobel away immediately… I'd feel so much more confident of their re-bonding that way, actually...” He trailed off, wistfully.
Read more... )

New Forts for Old.

Aug. 20th, 2017 03:22 pm
gridlore: Army Infantry school shield over crossed infantry rifles (Army Infantry)
[personal profile] gridlore
In the light of the current move to remove Confederate memorials and statues from public places (and thanks to the idiot Nazis who have accelerated that drive no end), I'd thought I'd turn my attention to the ten US Army posts still named for Confederates. In each case, I'm going to suggest a replacement name and give my reasons for why I think that person is the best choice.

In no particular order then:

  1. Fort Benning becomes Fort Bradley. Omar Bradley was an infantryman from the start and embraced combined arms warfare. As both a former commander of the Infantry School and the first commander of the 82nd Airborne (which received parachute training at Benning initially) the post would be well-served by this name.

  2. Fort Bragg becomes Fort Ridgway. Matthew Ridgway commanded the 82nd Airborne through most of WWII before commanding the XVIIIth Airborne Corps. Ridgway jumped on D-Day. Give the Home of the Airborne a name that reflects one of their own.

  3. Fort Hood becomes Fort Patton. Only fitting that the largest armor base in the Army, and a former site of a cavalry post, be named after the General synonymous with tanks in the service.

  4. Fort Lee becomes Fort Lafayette. Only about 50 miles from Yorktown, and holding the Army Ordnance, Quartermaster, and Transportation Schools, This is the perfect place to honor the French officer, and the French themselves, for all Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, did for our fledgling nation.

  5. Fort A. P. Hill becomes Fort DuPey. It's a training base and General DuPey was the first commander of the Training and Doctrine Command, better known as TRADOC. Also, I just know that troops will moan about a three-week deployment to Fort Dopey.

  6. Fort Pickett becomes Fort Morris. Seriously, the Virginia National Guard names its training base after the man associated with one of the biggest military disasters in American history? SGT Charles B. Morris earned the Medal of Honor in Vietnam and was born and raised in Virginia.

  7. Fort Polk becomes Fort Chennault. An officer from Louisiana who created the Flying Tigers in China and epitomized the idea of self-reliance and ingenuity in battle. Which is what they teach at the Joint Readiness Training Center

  8. Fort Rucker becomes Fort Baker. Addison Baker was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his actions while leading a leading a B-17 raid on the Ploesti oil fields in 1944. Makes more sense for the Home of Army Aviation (and we're coming for the A-10s!)

  9. Camp Beauregard becomes Camp Villeré. Jaques Villeré was the second governor of Louisiana and before that was the commander of the 1st Division of Louisana Militia at the Battle of New Orleans. Can you think of a better name for the Louisiana National Guard's main training facility? (Yes, he owned slaves. You try finding great military leaders from that state who didn't.)

  10. Finally, Fort Gordon becomes Fort Sherman. Because fuck the Confederacy.

What you y'all think? More importantly, what silly nicknames will soliders come up for these new post names?
thnidu: outline of Texas, colored like the state flag (Texas)
[personal profile] thnidu
The Best Trick U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves Ever Pulled on a Criminal
A particularly glorious example of “fake it ‘til you make it.”

facial portrait

by Eric Grundhauser
August 08, 2017



The American Old West was a fertile cauldron for myth and legend, producing such fantastical figures as Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill. But while many folk heroes of the era may have been embellished-unto-fable, or completely dreamt up, the legendary Wild West figure Bass Reeves was absolutely real, even if his exploits sound like tall tales.

Reeves was one of the most remarkable figures of the Old West, serving as a deputy U.S. Marshal from 1875 to 1907, mostly in and around the regrettable Indian Territory, which once made up much of what is now Oklahoma.

(Click title for article)

Heroic Action

Aug. 20th, 2017 01:35 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Three drag queens save a gaybashing victim.

"Growing up gay, I’ve been picked on and bullied and there comes a time when you fight back and you don’t care if you’ll get hurt or what happens to your wig."

<3 heroic speeches.
lunadelcorvo: (Default)
[personal profile] lunadelcorvo posting in [community profile] anti_theocracy
People keep saying “Islam is a peaceful religion,” and then they follow it up with “ISIL isn’t Islamic” or “ISIL is not real Islam, but a twisted and warped version of it.” Or, these days it’s “Those people aren’t real Christians” or “real Christians would never vote for this or that or so-and-so,” of “no Christian would EVER support the KKK/Nazis/white supremacists.”

No, I’m sorry. They claim the same creed, the same book, and the same deity. The feel themselves to be every bit as devout and sincere as you do. You don’t get to disown them because you don’t like how they interpret your faith. The problem is that who gets to say which is the “twisted and warped” version of any faith?

The extremists and fundamentalists all work from the same texts as the moderates. They tell the same stories, reference the same ancient history. In fact, they believe they have the true, real, and correct interpretation of their religion. They believe the moderates are the ones who have lost or perverted the true faith, by accommodating "modern" or "progressive" views. So for everyone who says “X extremist isn’t a true whatever?” Guess what? They think the same thing about you.

Both sides can find plenty of support in their texts and their traditions to support their claims. Who is qualified to say this one is right when this one is wrong? Oh, I know, you’ll tell me who is qualified. So will they. Their expert, or inspired preacher, or sage, or guru, will have just as much credibility as yours. That’s the problem with following bronze-age mythology: it’s ALL interpretation, and it can be used to support just about anything you want it to, and there is no authority behind any claim of the "correct" interpretation. And the bottom line is that all religions entail accepting claims without evidence, and elevating such claims over both facts and the competing claims of others. They also encourage the suspension of critical thinking at their core. Rather than promoting investigation, independent thought, critical thinking, or analysis, they command that the believer listen to the pastor/priest/rabbi/mullah. Believers are taught to follow authority and not question. Once you convince someone to do that, you can convince them of anything at all. And every holy book has a verse or six to back it up, be it hate or love, murder or charity. It takes a particularly deft species of rationalization and apologetics to be able to ignore the outright calls for violence. That the "majority" of religious people do not commit atrocities in the name of their religion is a credit to them, not to their doctrines.

Don’t get me wrong; I think all religions can be wonderful as forms of allegorical or metaphorical thinking. And as such, I have no issue with them. In fact, I think we as humans need to have allegory and metaphor and symbol; those modes of thought make our lives richer. It is perfectly fine to use Neptune as a way to envision or understand or ponder the fickle, treacherous, capricious, and powerful nature of the ocean. Or to ponder Ganesh as the embodiment of cleverness, joy in life, and benevolent mischief. I, personally, have both deep affection and appreciation for much of the Hindu (and Wiccan) pantheon as metaphorical archetypes that embody universal principles or truths. I am terrifically fond of Dante as a literary exemplar of the faith of his age and the core human struggle to discover who and what we have the potential to be. Mythology and allegory can genuinely inspire and enlighten us when we use them as tools of creative and imaginative thought.

However, the moment one decides there is actually a guy down there with a chariot drawn by hippocampi, waving a trident around, and that he is the reason that ship sank? Or the moment you decide there is an actual dude with an elephant's head put there by his father to replace the one he too hastily chopped off, and you need to appease him to get what you want out of life? In that moment, you aren't finding greater understanding of some universal truth, you've simply divorced yourself from reality and accepted something utterly in defiance of reason and without any evidence.

That's the problem with making nice with religion: when populations start to take their claims and myths literally, and suppose that they provide some sort of mandate for ethics or governance we have a problem. Because we are not working with reality, and because not everyone has chosen to embrace the same delusion. Then all manner of evil becomes possible. And then we're back to the problem above: who gets to say which version is the right one?

Think about it: if the Aztecs were still a thing, we'd be arguing with hardline fundamentalists who wanted to continue cutting the hearts out of living sacrifices, and insisting that those who call that practice barbaric are apostates swayed by heresy. On the other side would be moderates preaching that Quetzalcoatl was a god of love and peace, the ‘sacrifice’ is just an allegory for the harvest of corn, and claiming the extremists aren't really 'Quetzalites,' (or whatever), but have 'twisted the true faith.' No one would EVER be able to prove which side was right, because there was never a bird god to begin with, and it’s all just ancient mythology that can be use to justify anything. And of course, over here would be us atheists, shaking our heads, and telling the lot “you’re all still worshipping a bird, and you all need to grow the hell up.”

That's why I say humanity, if it is to survive and progress, need to keep ALL religions in the same box we keep Apollo and Odin and Gilgamesh. Sure, maybe we can pull them out once in a while when we want to wax poetic or be all metaphorical, but then put them back and close the lid. The rest of the time, when we have real problems to deal with, real lives to live, real people to live alongside, let's all use reason and science to navigate society and public life.
solarbird: (widow)
[personal profile] solarbird

[I can't believe I'm saying "Canon in the 'It is not easy to explain, she said'" Overwatch AU, but, well, this is the fourth story in this set, so, I guess it's an actual second AU now. AO3 link.]

[It is helpful to know that Widowmaker (in canon, and here) has a tattoo on her arm which incorporates the French word for "nightmare."]


It is not easy to imagine, thought the Widowmaker, propped up a little on pillows but between her two lovers, Lena, Tracer, sprawled along her right side, hands and arms jumbled about everywhere, like always, and Emily, Kestrel, on her left, arranged so neatly, even in sleep, even halfway through the night, even after turning over a few times, always tucked back in like the little hawk, her namesake in battle. Not even when it is real and in front of me.

She took one of her long, slow, deep breaths, and felt her heart beating, even more slowly than usual, so calm, so quiet, so at rest.

Were Gérard and Amélie like this? she wondered. It seemed impossible. Not just because that was only two, and this was three, and therefore obviously so much better, and not just because they were human, baseline human, with childhoods, and growing up, and stumbling about blindly until they figured how to make a life - though that last part, she finally understood, at least, a little - but because this, this perfection, it, too, seemed so impossible, so to conceive of it happening twice? Ludicrous. Foolish girl, she smiled to herself, it could not have been so... this.

It had taken some time to come up with a bed that the three of them could share. Widowmaker's low body temperature meant she needed similarly lower temperatures for real comfort, particularly in sleep, and both her lovers were so very warm. It'd been Angela's idea, a mattress made of medical thermal control columns, temperature regulated, sensing who lay where, and adjusting, automatically.

The doctor had got a paper out of it - modified to discuss burn victims and others with particularly sensitive skin - and had done fairly well from the patent rights. But Widowmaker didn't care about that. Widowmaker cared that she could sleep with her lovers whenever she wanted to, and whenever they wanted her to, and it would just work.

She breathed in the scent of her brown-haired love, the teleporter, nuzzling down a little into that silly, tossed hair. Unimaginably wonderful. She shifted just a little, carefully, and did the same of her red-haired love, the flying officer, and the scent was so very different and yet so much the same. So wonderful.

And softly, so softly, her breath caught, and water pooled in her eyes, and she sniffed, not wanting to, but she still did, and she tried to stop herself, to stop the tears, but that just made her laugh, just a little, and trying to stop that, too, made more of all it it happen.

Emily awoke, blinking, but lay still except to look up towards the sniffling. "Sweet? What... are you crying?"

"No," whispered Widowmaker. "Yes."

"Oh, love, what's wrong?"

"Nothing. Go back to sleep." She laughed a little more, shaking again, and from Lena came a little "mmf?" and she blinked those big brown eyes that Widowmaker could see so clearly even in the low light.

"You too. Go back to sleep."

"Wuzzit?" said Lena, awake enough now to attempt words, but still, at least half asleep.

"But what's wrong?"

"Nothing," sniffed Widowmaker. "Nothing. Nothing." She leaned over and kissed the half-asleep Lena on top of her head. "Everything is wonderful," and then did the same for Emily.

"Why're you crying?" asked Lena.

"I am... so happy," said the blue assassin, half-sobbing, smiling, confused, but not caring. "I..."

She stopped, and her eyes opened wide.

"I found it," she whispered.

"What?" asked Emily, reaching up to run her fingers through Widowmaker's hair.

"Yeah, love - what?" asked Lena, reaching up to do the same from the other side. Her hand met Emily's, and she smiled, as their fingers intertwined.

"Perfection." She brought her two lovers tightly against her, laughing, crying, all at the same time, the emotions, they are too much she thought, gasping, but that is also perfect. "This perfection."

Lena blinked. "You mean... like before? At the beginning, when you were made? But... here, now? ... with us?"

Widowmaker nodded, not being able to put it into better words. "Everything is so beautiful."

"Oh my god."

Emily chuckled. "You're beautiful too, you know that, right?"

"Love, no, she means it. Losing this is why she left Talon."

"Yes," whispered the spider.

Oh. Emily hadn't been there when the assassin had told the story, but she remembered it, and how it affected Lena. "And now you've got it back?" she asked.

"Yes," nodded the Widowmaker. "It is... different. But better." She sniffled. "Everything is so beautiful."

"Is any part of this bad?" asked Emily, a little worried, a little unsure, a little amazed. The assassin's body always carried tension, tension she could feel in her muscles, feel almost in her skin. And she did not feel it. It was... gone.

"No," breathed the Widowmaker. "Oh no, oh, oh no. It is wonderful. I am so happy."

"You sure?" asked Lena.

"Yes."

"Completely sure?" asked Emily.

"Yes."

"Good," said Lena, as the three snuggled back in together, and the three of them slowly drifted back to sleep.

What would my makers think of me now? wondered the spider, as she slid back towards her dreams, laughing, to herself, just a little. And then when she did sleep, she slept smiling, finding her dreams new, and happy, and not unlike her life now, found, new, and happy.

She would need to change her tattoo. No more nightmares. None. At least, not, for now.

[syndicated profile] don_marti_feed

When I set up this blog, I put in a script to check how many of the users here are protected from third-party tracking.

The best answer for now is 31%. Of the clients that ran JavaScript on this site over the past two weeks, 31% did not also run JavaScript from the Aloodo "fake third-party tracker".

The script is here: /code/check3p.js

This is not as good as I had hoped (turn on your tracking protection, people! Don't get tricked by ad blockers that leave you unprotected by default!) but it's a start.

The Information Trust Exchange is doing research on the problem of third-party tracking at news sites. News industry consultant Greg Swanson:

All of the conversations on the newspaper side have been focused on how can we join the advertising technology ecosystem. For example, how can a daily newspaper site in Bismarck, North Dakota deliver targeted advertising to a higher-value soccer mom? And none of the newspapers them have considered the fact that when they join that ecosystem they are enabling spam sites, fraudulent sites – enabling those sites to get a higher CPM rate by parasitically riding on the data collected from the higher-value newspaper sites.

More info: Aloodo for web publishers.

Ugliness in Boston

Aug. 20th, 2017 07:51 am
madfilkentist: Photo of Carl (Default)
[personal profile] madfilkentist
Not a shining day for Boston, but not as horrible as I thought it might be. Here I'm going by Boston.com's coverage. Timing notes follow the article. They're the times of the posts, not necessarily when things happened.

Reported events from Saturday )

Conclusions? The number of people trying to intimidate or harm people must have been relatively small, considering the size of the crowd, or there would have been far worse. Nonetheless, it's significant that every act of aggression, or nearly so, came from people masquerading as "anti-Nazis" or "anti-racists." (They're neither, but just bullies.) They're the kind people who shout down speakers or block access whenever they can. The kind who think their throwing rocks and urine is "kinetic beauty." They usually confine their actions to college campuses, where they think they won't be punished.

It's very disturbing when the police commissioner says it's a "good thing" that people can't get to hear a message he doesn't want them to hear. That's the voice of the police state.

Also disturbing is the lack of any intellectual content to the protest. It was, as far as I can see, basically an exercise in name-calling. Or at least that's all that we get to hear through the usual news reporting. When they use "nazi" to insult anyone whose message they don't like, it accomplishes two things:

(1) It trivializes actual Nazis. In Charlottesville, there were actual, swastika-wearing Nazis chanting "blood and soil." Nazism supports many of the worst forms of brutality ever devised, including the murder of millions.

(2) It mainstreams Nazism. If everyone you dislike is a Nazi, then maybe Nazis aren't so bad. At least some people will think that way.

Is this the new normal in America? Mobs forming to intimidate every speaker they don't like? Then we might as well give up on America.

Update: Based on this Eagle-Tribune article, people were prevented from hearing the speakers. According to one account, "They spoke for about 40 minutes. Whenever they got loud enough for anyone over here to hear them, people booed them and drowned them out."

On the other hand, the rally itself sounds strange: "The group had gathered to share members' views on free speech, but did not allow any members of the press inside the barricades. They had no public address system and could not be heard by the thousands that had gathered to protest the rally." Nor by those who gathered to hear it, it seems. That would explain the lack of coverage of content. If they wanted to be heard, why did they not bring sound equipment or let any press in?

The Eagle-Tribune article notes that Antifa people were present, and it's reasonable to suspect they were behind the worst acts. The article notes that in one case of bullying, some protesters "shouted for them to not engage physically, and others still helped police escort him to safety." I think the overwhelming majority of the crowd was good people, but the danger is letting the pro-violence, anti-free speech people become their public face.

Update 2: A bike ride later, what remains disturbing to me is that thousands of people were so upset that someone they didn't like was speaking in public that they had to denounce it in exaggerated terms. These people had just a Facebook page rather than a real Web presence, were confused about how to get a permit, and didn't have a PA system. The event would have gone by without any notice, but that would have been horribly unforgivable.

Been away for a while

Aug. 20th, 2017 12:59 pm
moem: A computer drawing that looks like me. (Default)
[personal profile] moem
I've not been reading or posting here because I was busy, mostly because of SHA2017 (the quadrannual hacker camp) which was a blast! Here's a very cool video that should give you a quick impression in less than 3 minutes, with no talking:
Below a cut because who wants a video to open on their reading page? )
Today I'm doing something else: a food experiment. I have tried soy milk once but found it too sweet; today I'm trying oat milk and I have to say it's pretty tasty! If you like oats, at least. Which I do. It does not contain calcium however, and that's one of the things I drink milk for.
Next up: almond milk with added calcium!

You might ask, why this experiment? Well, while I like milk, I'm wondering whether I could happily use less of it. I don't like the idea of cows being exploited for it, even if we try to get most or our milk at a dairy farm. The whole system as it is is pretty unnatural. I can't see myself quitting cheese, but I figure every bit helps!
Have any of you tried a non-dairy milk? Which one, and what did you think of it?

Irregular Webcomic! #1607 Rerun

Aug. 20th, 2017 10:11 am
[syndicated profile] irregular_comic_rss3_feed
Comic #1607

I'm not very keen on hollandaise. I think this recipe would be an improvement.

Open sauce describes a product distribution model in which the product is made available to the general public for use, modification, and repurposing with little or no intellectual property protection.

It's cool because it allows you to do anything you like with the sauce recipe. A prime example (although pushing the "sauce" envelope a bit) is OpenCola.


2017-08-20 Rerun commentary: That is one huge bottle of Tabasco sauce Jamie is brandishing. I'm not sure why I wrote "tabasco" with a lower case "t" in the comic. If I was making this now, I'd user a capital letter. I'm also curious why I wrote that I'm not keen on hollandaise. Nowadays I like it just fine, particularly on eggs Benedict - though given how fatty it is I don't have it very often.

Traveling: Visions

Aug. 20th, 2017 09:57 am
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Sunday, August 20, 2017 - 02:57

Just a quick note this time. Yesterday we did a little more wandering around Durham. Checked out the stalls in the Old Market Hall looking for gifts, but didn't see anything that really grabbed me. Went off to look at Sara & Joel's new house that they're gradually getting fixed up for moving in and had serious Old House Envy. (18th century beams! 0.5 meter thick back wall (now an interior wall of the house)! Cute postage-stamp back garden with sheds!) Had lunch and a pint in the pub right around the corner from the new (old) house.

Spent the afternoon resting up for the jaunt to York today, plus doing a bunch of exporting, formatting, and annotating of my files from the Great Welsh Name Database which I'm handing over to Sara for use in the DMNES project (Dictionary of Medieval Names from European Sources). This is, to some extent, an acknowledgement that I'm unlikely to do more work on the database in the near future. But I've always meant to ask if she wanted the data to use and this was a chance to talk about how the current files are structured and what some of the analytic data was trying to do.

Major category: 

My new favorite headcanon

Aug. 20th, 2017 01:54 am
elf: Subvert (Subvert)
[personal profile] elf
I decided I loved Jewish Bucky Barnes in spitandvinegar's Ain't No Grave (Can Keep My Body Down) (requires AO3 account), in part because I love the sound of "John the Revelator" and that falls in the category of guilty pleasures. (Absolutely nobody in my life knows which gospel songs I still enjoy.) I love-love-LOVE the idea of an openly, firmly non-Christian character latching on to a particular gospel song.

Also, the fic is incredibly awesome and the slow-burn romance is sometimes hilarious and the OC's deserve a novel of their own.

I've been enjoying Jewish Bucky in other fics; it makes a delightful contrast to Steve's well-known Catholicism, and a secret they kept together during the war, possibly along with the secret of their orientation. (Secretly Gay!Steve and Secretly Gay!Bucky are also good headcanons, but it's not like those are remotely unique to this fandom.)

Ring the Bell Backwards was in the Stucky zine from k'start, and it's sweet and achy and hard to read more than once. (In a good way.) Canon-compliant through Civil War, and exactly the kind of plot we have fanfic for - the comics could never do this.

4F by stoatsandwich is a skinny!Steve AU that's a bit darker than my taste for the pairing runs, but when I first ran across it, I slammed through the whole series. Mind the tags; don't read if you don't like that kind of content, because this fic pulls no punches. Also locked to archive accounts.

What's in a Name is shorter, very introspective, and Bucky's Jewish background is part of what helps him rebuild his identity. Says it's the first of a series, but there's no other works, and it's been a couple of years, so it's likely abandoned. But it does nicely stand on its own.

three white horses was posted yesterday, so I'm getting in on the recs game before it shoots to the top of the kudos-sorted lists. Whoa yah, I will read that again. ... Eventually. (Mind the tags & warnings, if you care about that kind of thing.) This is the one that convinced me, "oh hey... this is like a Thing, isn't it? I could go find more fics with this tag?"

And there's more highly-kudosed fics that I haven't read, so I'm looking forward to exploring all those YAAAY.
annathepiper: (Blue Hawaii Relaxing)
[personal profile] annathepiper

The one major thing I was sad about re: our trip to Quebec–other than the saga of Dara’s lost luggage, and I’ll get to that–was that I got to spend only a few hours in Montreal. And that was only because the travel plans meant I had a bit of buffer time between when I arrived at the hotel, and when I needed to rendezvous with the shuttle going to Camp Violon Trad.

Because, fortunately, there was in fact going to be a shuttle. The camp’s staffer in charge of communicating with campers, when she sent out a notice in June telling us what to expect, mentioned that they’d be running a shuttle from downtown Montreal up to where Camp Violon Trad actually happens. I was quite happy about this news, because this meant I didn’t have to try to rent a car and navigate my way northward through a French-speaking province.

(Note that the street signs at this point probably wouldn’t have given me a problem. I’m good enough with reading French at this point that I can figure out roughly where I am, if I need to. The tricky parts would just be not being familiar with any specific traffic laws in Quebec. Or if I had to pull over for directions, or got pulled over by a cop or something–because then I’d have to try to communicate and my conversational French is not up to speed yet. But that was also part of why I wanted to go to Camp Violon Trad. More on this to come, too.)

What amused the hell out of me about the camp shuttle was this: the designated pickup point was right by the Berri-UQAM Metro station. Which, as it turns out, was about the only part of Montreal I knew anything about, because when Dara and I had spent our weekend there in 2012, that very corner was right by the hotel we stayed at, the Lord Berri.

This meant that I also knew that there was an Archambault there, and I knew there were a lot of shops and restaurants and things within immediate walking distance. So, that gave me at least a bit of buffer time, long enough for running errands and having a brunch, between “leaving the hotel” and “rendezvousing with the shuttle”.

Getting out of the hotel

Getting out of the hotel was a bit of a challenge. I knew that in theory there was a bus I could take from the airport to the aforementioned Metro station, and I remembered that on the way in the night before, I’d walked past a kiosk that looked like it had information for the bus in question. But I got a little lost walking around with my luggage through the airport–which, now that it was a much saner morning hour, was a lot busier than when I’d arrived the night before.

Turned out I’d come down onto the wrong floor. I had to backtrack a bit, but ultimately, found that kiosk. And determined that I had to buy a pass that’d cost me ten bucks (Canadian). This struck me as expensive. But on the other hand, it was still significantly cheaper than paying for a taxi.

The bus in question, the 747 (not to be confused with the jet, lol), had a stop not far from the ticket kiosk. So I got out there and soon enough was on my way.

It was awfully bright that morning, so I had my sunglasses on. This impacted my ability to look at things en route, but I did notice that Montreal was undergoing a lot of construction. Rather like Seattle, in that respect.

Once I was off the bus

The bus route was very straightforward: get on the bus at the airport, and get off the bus at its very last stop. So there was no risk of confusion or anything in that regard.

There was a bit of confusion as I was turned around regarding what street I was on once I was off the bus, but that was easily corrected. I found the Archambault (and the Lord Berri right beside it) as landmarks quickly enough. And that let me orient myself on the plan I had for the morning: go to a pharmacy a couple blocks north of the Archambault, then go to the Archambault, then go find something to eat, and finally, rendezvous with the shuttle.

On the way to the pharmacy (and back again, for that matter) I got panhandled in French. Or at least, one active panhandle and one attempt to see if I spoke French, but which I suspected was a panhandle. I was rather amused by that, just because being panhandled in a different language was at least a bit of a switch.

I was also deeply amused by this, which was not something I expected to see in Montreal.

Apparently, at least one Elvis impersonator is a big deal there. Ha!

The Archambault was the major errand I wanted to run (the pharmacy was just for necessities). And what I wanted was Tolkien things in French! I nabbed a French translation of The Silmarillion: this one, to be specific. And I bought the Blu-ray set of The Lord of the Rings movies again, but this time because this set actually had French dubs of all three movies. The US releases we’ve already bought–both the DVDs and the Blu-rays–do not have French dubs, which baffles the hell out of me. Portuguese, yes. French, no. To this day I do not for the life of me understand that particular marketing decision!

I amused the clerk at the counter telling him I wanted to practice my French by doing the reading, and by watching the French dubs of the movies. He tried to warn me that The Silmarillion is not exactly an easy book to follow. I assured him that I had read it repeatedly in English, so yes, I was very, very aware. ;D

I’m pretty sure I provided at least a bit of amusement of my own to passersby on the street, just because I was dragging my suitcase around behind me, with my backpack on top of it so I wouldn’t have the weight of it on my back. And of course, I also had my fiddle, which was what I was carrying on my back instead, since it was lighter than the backpack. This led to multiple conversations with people about how I was in the middle of a lot of travel and was on my way north for the next leg of my journey.

Finally I did make it to Juliette et Chocolat, which had been recommended to me on Facebook as a good source of brunch. And which, in fact, I was pretty sure I’d remembered going to in 2012. The brunch was in fact excellent. So was the dessert, a thing called “petit pot fleur de sel”, which was all chocolate-mousse-y and salted-caramel-y and gracious that thing was tasty.

Eventually I wandered around as much as I felt I was up for wandering around. Half of me really wanted to go to the Café des chats, one of Montreal’s cat cafes, but it was just a bit too far of a walk when I was hauling luggage around with me. So I finally just parked for a bit at the corner, sat in the shade, and hung out playing Gummy Drop on my iPad; while I was doing that, I had another random conversation with a gent amused by my stack of luggage.

That didn’t kill enough time, so I got up and wandered off again to go into a nearby coffeeshop for a cold beverage and a visit to a ladies’ room. And that accomplished, I came back again and finally found some folks waiting in a little cluster with violin cases and other luggage.

I’d found the Camp Violon Trad crowd!

Waiting for the shuttle

I discovered to my surprise that I was not actually the only person from the extended Seattle-area session crowd. One of the other ladies waiting for the shuttle was another Seattle person. So that was awesome to discover. 😀 Turned out we had a bit of a wait on our hands, once we greeted one another and exchanged names and such. None of us were particularly sure which corner the shuttle would be showing up on, or even what kind of vehicle we were looking for.

It was a good thing for me that there was public municipal wifi available, though, because that let me check my mail–and find an update sent out by the camp coordinator, Ghislaine, warning us that there had been a bit of a mixup as to vehicle rentals, and that there would be two drivers coming, but one was running late. Which ultimately meant that there’d be two cars for about six passengers, so we had to divide up who would ride with which driver.

The driver I rode with was a fellow named Luc. Who, as it turned out, is André Brunet’s cousin! He was very nice, and told me and the other two ladies riding with him that he taught English. The route he chose to take northward was a bit random, since he wanted to avoid the tunnel that runs underneath the St. Lawrence river, which is often very crowded. None of us minded, as it was a pleasant drive. I amused myself practicing reading signs we went past, as well as keeping up with the bilingual conversation going on in the car.

Once we made it to St-Côme, I was able to observe that it is a) tiny, and b) kind of adorable. The same applied to Plein Air Lanaudia, the site of Camp Violon Trad. There was a lovely lake there, a bunch of trees, and assorted chalets that we were all staying in.

But more on this in Part 3 of the trip report!

Mirrored from angelahighland.com.

Fierce Against the Men

Aug. 19th, 2017 08:46 pm
elf: A purple rook with wings spread; the word "Glitch" above it and "Don't Panic" below. (Glitch - Don't Panic)
[personal profile] elf
"There are two important things to remember about the coming revolutions. The first is that we will get our asses kicked. The second is that we will win."

I am not playing the "what doesn't kill us makes us stronger" game. It doesn't; it makes us injured and tired and afraid for our families. But I will say: We have endured worse; we fought back white supremacists when they had a lot more political and social pull. The must frustrating part of this whole struggle is the sense of, "weren't we DONE with this part already?"

No, we weren't. We squashed a lot of the overt oppression and racism and left it to fester, in part because we were just so damned tired, and in part with the hope that seeing a thriving nation would show how much healthier, happier, and more prosperous diverse cultures are.

Oops. We forgot that it's not really about having better lives for themselves or their children. It's all about having someone to lash out at, someone they could blame when times are hard and someone to crush when times are good.

I miss the music Leigh Ann would have made, but I am so glad to have the inspiration of the music she left: The Burning Times seems very appropriate this week.
I will not answer hate with fear;
Nor with a smug, cheek-turning love;
I will not answer hate with rage;
By strength alone will I not be moved—

Rise up, witches, gather your strength,
And let your power spread and climb;
Earth and all her children need us,
For all face now the Burning Times.
We have, sigh, been here before, and we have the tools we need to work against white supremacist poison, anti-gay poison, misogynistic poison, evangelical poison, and all the other toxins that seek to erode a vibrant, inclusive, kaleidoscopic, welcoming, joyfully celebratory society.

archangelbeth: An anthropomorphic feline face, with feathered wing ears, and glasses, in shades of gray. (Default)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Not so good to get to bed at 4am again, but at least sleeping till 2pm got me some, well, sleep.

Havva Quote
M__ should try Black Sails at some point.
w~~~~~~~ keeps briefly misreading as "Black Snails".
[anon@emit] "Arr," they say, oozing their way across the deck.


INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )
kyburg: (Default)
[personal profile] kyburg
naamahdarling:

Hey, I’m looking for a name change buddy.

I’m NB Alex, moving on from Amanda.

I need to find a trans or NB Amanda moving on from Alex.

I want to trade, because I think that will help me feel more settled and comfortable, ‘cause right now it still feels stiff and weird.  I think some human contact would help me feel like part of my own story again.

I’m dead serious, if you are an ex-Alex Amanda, I want to mail you my old name on a piece of paper, and have you mail me yours.

Please reblog or pass on to any folks you might know.

I will update this post if I find someone, thank you!

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2v2gGex
via IFTTT
kyburg: (Default)
[personal profile] kyburg
“I think if there’s a single thing that’s actually happening so far during this administration that is reshaping government and affecting the population broadly, it is what is going on in the regulatory area. … Trump … for the most part, his legislative agenda has not really gone anywhere, but more quietly, in each of the agencies across the federal government, his appointees have been rolling back rules … in just about every sector of the government – from health and the environment, and financial regulatory matters, and workplace safety. And it is pretty extraordinary and it’s happening at such a rapid pace.”
- Eric Lipton, New York Times reporter, with Terry Gross (via nprfreshair) http://ift.tt/eA8V8J
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2v2sFsG
via IFTTT

Poem: "The Bamboo That Bends"

Aug. 19th, 2017 06:05 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem is from the August 1, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired by prompts from [personal profile] siliconshaman and [personal profile] librarygeek. It also fills the "family portraits" square in my 7-1-16 card for the Winter Fest in July Bingo. This poem has been sponsored by Anthony & Shirley Barrette. It belongs to the Officer Pink thread of the Polychrome Heroics series.

Read more... )
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Demands and Decisions
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 5 of 6
word count (story only): 1138


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and the Road Trip arc, this is where Joshua's brain finally goes 'tilt,' but while there is tension, several good things develop as a result. ::


:: This story is sponsored by Callibr8, and she knows why! ::




“Fine. Parental leave… can I give you a solid three months, and then maybe you won't need the other three?” Chief Mayhew asked hopefully. “Seriously, we're down two officers able to train the rookies right this minute, and Gonzalez is probably going on maternity leave the next time she drives over a speed bump the wrong way, which will take out one of our conflict resolution team, and it's harder to work out disputes with an even number of arbiters.”

“Thank you, sir,” Joshua breathed. “I'll… probably know more about what I want to do at the three month mark, yes. It's… not the same thing when I could orphan so many kids who can't even dress themselves.”

“Drop by the station when you get a minute to sign the paperwork, but I can email you the document for a temporary digital signature right now,” the Chief offered warmly. “And I'll start the usual congratulations card and basket. Should I leave off anything?”

Joshua pinched the bridge of his nose, just as someone else asked, “Chief, did you just imply that someone needed a psych evaluation for having kids?” in a slow, dangerously calm tone.
Read more... )

Saturday Yardening

Aug. 19th, 2017 04:50 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is mostly sunny and hot.  :P  We picked up three piles of grass, and I filled the trolley with sticks to dump in the firepit.

Lots of butterflies out, though, and bees.  Yay bumblebees, boo sweat bees. 

CalExit is back!

Aug. 19th, 2017 02:17 pm
elf: Sydney Scoville, looking very determined, saying, "Let's do this." (Let's do this.)
[personal profile] elf
Just got an email saying: Calexit relaunches with new leader, new ballot initiative, and a new book
The Yes California Independence Campaign has relaunched with a new president. Marcus Ruiz Evans, a co-founder of Yes California who previously served as the organization’s vice president, has taken the helm.

Among the first actions Evans took in his new role was to close the doors of the organization’s embattled representational embassy and culture center opened last year in Moscow, Russia.
Revised website | Revised propaganda book
They need to file their revised referendum by Aug 22, which is next Tuesday; they're asking for donations for the filing fee. (I am not donating. I'm pretty sure that people with a lot more money to spare than I have support this, and if that's not the case, this is going absolutely nowhere.)

I love the idea; I am entirely certain it can go nowhere. They make a nice case for "How California could work as its own nation;" the whole thing assumes that the rest of the US would let us go. Not gonna happen.

No way is the rest of the nation going to allow us to remove our resources. )

Poem: "As Couples as Possible"

Aug. 19th, 2017 03:12 pm
ysabetwordsmith: (Fly Free)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This is the freebie for the August [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam, inspired by a prompt from [personal profile] alexseanchai. It also fills the "hobbies" square in my 7-31-17 card for the Cottoncandy Bingo fest.


"As Couples As Possible"


A dancer fell in love
with a mathematician,

their affection stymied by
his love of all things body,
her love of all things brain,

until they discovered
square dancing.

* * *

Notes:

"As couples as possible" -- Work as a couple whenever possible. Re-evaluate the formation after each part of the call.
-- Square Dance Dictionary

Dance is a popular form of artistic exercise.  Geometry is the mathematics of shape.  Put them together and you get the math of square dance.

kyburg: (Default)
[personal profile] kyburg
Ice cream and pretty beeswax candles. I don’t get here often enough. #niseiweek2017 (at Honeymee)

http://ift.tt/2x102NV
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2vO9Jkk
via IFTTT
[syndicated profile] don_marti_feed

The field of Search Engine Optimization has white hat SEO, black hat SEO, and gray hat SEO.

White hat SEO helps a user get a better search result, and complies with search engine policies. Examples include accurately using the same words that users search on, and getting honest inbound links.

Black hat SEO is clearly against search engine policies. Link farming, keyword stuffing, cloaking, and a zillion other schemes. If they see you doing it, your site gets penalized in search results.

Gray hat SEO is everything that doesn't help the user get a better search result, but technically doesn't violate a search engine policy.

Most SEO experts advise you not to put a lot of time and effort into gray hat, because eventually the search engines will notice your gray hat scheme and start penalizing sites that do it. Gray hat is just stuff that's going to be black hat when the search engines figure it out.

Adtech has gray hat, too. Rocket Fuel Awarded Two Patents to Help Leverage First-Party Cookies to More Meaningfully Reach Consumers.

This scheme seems to be intended to get around existing third-party cookie protection, which is turned on by default in Apple Safari and available in other browsers.

But how long will it work?

Maybe the browser of the future won't run a "kangaroo cookie court" but will ship with a built-in "kangaroo law school" so that each copy of the browser will develop its own local "courts" and its own local "case law" based on the user's choices. It will become harder to predict how long any single gray hat adtech scheme will continue working.

In the big picture: in order to sell advertising you need to give the advertiser some credible information on who the audience is. Since the "browser wars" of the 1990s, most browsers have been bad at protecting personal information about the user, so web advertising has become a game where a whole bunch of companies compete to covertly capture as much user info as they can.

Today, browsers are getting better at implementing people's preferences about sharing their information. The result is a change in the rules of the game. Investment in taking people's personal info is becoming less rewarding, as browsers compete to reflect people's preferences. (That patent will be irrelevant thanks to browser updates long before it expires.)

And investments in building sites and brands that are trustworthy enough for people to want to share their information will tend to become more rewarding. (This shift naturally leads to complaints from people who are used to winning the old game, but will probably be better for customers who want to use trustworthy brands and for people who want to earn money by making ad-supported news and cultural works.)

Bonus links

One of the big advertising groups is partnering with Digital Content Next’s trust-focused ad marketplace

Partisanship, Propaganda, and Disinformation: Online Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

ANA Endorses TrustX, Encourages Members To Use Programmatic Media-Buying Stamp Of Approval

Call for Papers: Policy and Internet Special Issue on Reframing ‘Fake News’: Architectures, Influence, and Automation

Time to sink the Admiral (or, why using the DMCA to block adblockers is a bad move)

I'm a woman in computer science. Let me ladysplain the Google memo to you.

Easylist block list removes entry after DMCA takedown notice

Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?

Uber drivers gang up to cause surge pricing, research says

Google reveals sites with ‘failing’ ads, including Forbes, LA Times

Koch group, Craigslist founder come to Techdirt's aid

The Mozilla Information Trust Initiative: Building a movement to fight misinformation online

Are Index Funds Evil?

When Silicon Valley Took Over Journalism

How publishers can beat fraudsters at their own game

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men from Hate Speech But Not Black Children

Dangerous associations

Aug. 19th, 2017 06:46 am
madfilkentist: Photo of Carl (Default)
[personal profile] madfilkentist
One of the people charged with violent acts in Charlottesville is from New Hampshire and has libertarian connections. I have no personal connection with Christopher Cantwell and don't believe I've ever met him, but the matter concerns me. The Free Keene group in southwestern New Hampshire has a good piece on him.

Cantwell espoused libertarian views at one time, before becoming an alt-right white supremacist. Even back then, the article says, he supported violence against the police. Staying clear of someone like that is a good idea, if only for your own safety. He claims he used pepper spray only in self-defense, and that's a matter for the legal process. It's his ideas which concern me.

Cantwell's own account is disturbing reading. He makes it clear that he supports the alt-right and its underlying notion of "race identity." It's incompatible with any sound concept of libertarianism. Libertarianism holds people should be evaluated as individuals. Race identity holds that people are just specimens of a physiological type.

I post tweets for LPSeacoast, the seacoast branch of the New Hampshire Libertarian Party. At first I wasn't aware of the need to distance ourselves from the alt-right, any more than we need to distance ourselves from the Taliban. But there are always people ready to tar their opponents by association. Brian, who's better attuned to practical politics than I am, caught on to this first. For the past few days, we've been hammering on this point.

Irregular Webcomic! #1606 Rerun

Aug. 19th, 2017 10:11 am
[syndicated profile] irregular_comic_rss3_feed
Comic #1606

Alternate punchlines:

  • Martian 1: What, already?
  • Martian 1: You're kidding.
  • Martian 1: About time.
But in the end I went for understatement. Because I figured it would be so much less expected than any of those. And it implies the Martians know what's happening in the Halls of Power...
2017-08-19 Rerun commentary: The first three panels are a deliberate allusion to the film Clear and Present Danger, by the way, in case anyone missed that. And not just the title either, for those of you haven't seen it, but indeed the plot. The final panel kind of turns that completely on its head, to provide a twist/gag for those familiar with the movie.

Many Faces chapter 37

Aug. 19th, 2017 03:34 am
fayanora: SK avatar (Default)
[personal profile] fayanora
Chapter 37 of "The Many Faces of Har--er, Adira Potter" is up now!

AO3 version

FanFiction.net version

BigCloset version
kyburg: (Default)
[personal profile] kyburg
dr-kara:

shrewreadings:

a-mongrel:

good spiky, prickly, flower-children.

Those are so cool. What kind are they?

Opuntia macrocentra! 

Delicious.

http://ift.tt/2myCfT2
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2vN2n0f
via IFTTT

Crowdfunding Creative Jam

Aug. 19th, 2017 04:11 am
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
The [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam is now open with a theme of "Moving the Body."


What I Have Written

"As Couples as Possible" is today's freebie.


From My Prompts

Crowdfunding Creative Jam

Aug. 19th, 2017 04:08 am
ysabetwordsmith: (Crowdfunding butterfly ship)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith posting in [community profile] crowdfunding
Welcome to the sixty-fourth Crowdfunding Creative Jam! This session will run Saturday, August 19-Sunday, August 20. The theme is "Moving the Body."


Crowdfunding Creative Jam

Everyone is eligible to post prompts, which may be words or phrases, titles, images, etc. Prompters may request a specific creator, but everyone else may still use that prompt if they wish. Prompts may specify a particular character/world/etc. but creators may use the prompt for something else anyway and post the results. Prompters are still encouraged to post mostly prompts that anyone could use anywhere, as this maximizes the chance of having creators make something based on your prompt. Please title your comment "Prompt" or "Prompts" when providing inspiration so these are easy to find.

Prompt responses may also be treated as prompts and used for further inspiration. For example, a prompt may lead to a sketch which leads to a story, and so on. This kind of cascading inspiration is one of the most fun things about a collective jam session.

Everyone is eligible to use prompts, and everyone who wants to use a given prompt may do so, for maximum flexibility of creator choice in inspiration. You do not have to post a "Claim" reply when you decide to use a prompt, but this does help indicate what is going on so that other prompters can spread out their choice of prompts if they wish.

Creators are encouraged, but not required, to post at least one item free. Likewise, sharing a private copy of material with the prompter is encouraged but not required. Creative material resulting from prompts should be indicated in a reply to the prompt, with a link to the full content elsewhere on the creator's site (if desired); a brief excerpt and/or description of the material may be included in the reply (if desired). It helps to title your comment "Prompt Filled" or something like that so these are easy to identify. There is no time limit on responding to prompts. However, creators are encouraged to post replies sooner rather than later, as the attention of prompters will be highest during and shortly after the session.

Some items created from prompts may become available for sponsorship. Some creators may offer perks for donations, linkbacks, or other activity relating to this project. Check creator comments and links for their respective offerings.

Prompters, creators, and bystanders are expected to behave in a responsible and civil manner. If the moderators have to drag someone out of the sandbox for improper behavior, we will not be amused. Please respect other people's territory and intellectual property rights, and only play with someone else's characters/setting/etc. if you have permission. (Fanfic/fanart freebies are okay.) If you want to invite folks to play with something of yours, title the comment something like "Open Playground" so it's easy to spot. This can be a good way to attract new people to a shared world or open-source project, or just have some good non-canon fun.

Boost the signal! The more people who participate, the more fun this will be. Hopefully we'll see activity from a lot of folks who regularly mention their projects in this community, but new people are always welcome. You can link to this session post or to individual items created from prompts, whatever you think is awesome enough to recommend to your friends.
kyburg: (Default)
[personal profile] kyburg
the-movemnt:

— Zak Cheney-Rice, It’s not enough to be disgusted by Charlottesville

follow @the-movemnt

http://ift.tt/eA8V8J
from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2xd3TGV
via IFTTT

9 hours sleep? Maybe? And NEW WASHER!

Aug. 19th, 2017 12:46 am
archangelbeth: Bleary-eyed young woman peers up, pillow obscuring the lower half of her face. Text reads: SO not a morning person. (So Not A Morning Person)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
It starts up like a demented astromech, but it has a "blow air and tumble occasionally" setting that will run up to 12 hours, so hopefully forgetting the laundry for a few hours will not cause me to have to fight mildew odor, yay?

Hat tip to Conuly: http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/08/16/543920822/probiotic-bacteria-could-protect-newborns-from-deadly-infection

Edit: Hat tip to the Bujold Dreamwidth (and probably livejournal) community: Georgette Heyer books on sale at Amazon, B&N, and iBooks for $2.99! At least, in the US.

Eating straw wrappers seems to correlate with my mood being slightly better? Maybe? Dunno?

Still hugely sleepy. Maybe I'm fighting off a bug. -_-

More good thoughts for friends, please. And for the state of medical research.

Havva Quote
f___ says, “This show is /so good/. And because life and socialization are as they are, I feel bad about saying that, because I do not want to create hype overload and thus make people disappointed in a good show becuase it wasn't as good as they'd been led to believe.”
f___ says, “But, damn, this show.”
--I think this is about Black Sails?


INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Demands and Decisions
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 4 of 6
word count (story only): 1175


:: Part of the Polychrome Heroics universe, the Mercedes story set, and the Road Trip arc, this is where Joshua's brain finally goes 'tilt,' but while there is tension, several good things develop as a result. ::


:: This story is sponsored by Callibr8, and she knows why! ::




Wide-eyed, the Asian man stared at Cash, who made a 'gimme' gesture with his left hand. “Pay up,” the former bank robber declared. “I told you that it wouldn't work, Contrarian.”

The young man drew a bright pink leather wallet out of his back pocket and began rummaging through the card slots, retrieving two Greenbucks cards, then dipping into a concealed pocket for a third. “There. How'd you know?”

“I know him well enough for beer and pizza over movies so bad that the whole point is to mock them.” Cash laughed.

Contrarian narrowed his eyes, studying the blond officer. “So, how did you know that I wasn't really ticked off, or worried about the kids?”
Read more... )

[Ω] Juxtaposition

Aug. 18th, 2017 11:44 pm
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
(h/t [personal profile] fiddlingfrog)

UrsulaV bats it out of the park:

https://twitter.com/UrsulaV/status/898201836800364547/photo/1

(Note, this requires clicking through to see two images.)

[me, pshrinkery] Home Again

Aug. 18th, 2017 10:45 pm
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
The conference is over, and I am super tired and omg why do my feet hurt? I didn't do that much walking, and indeed spent most of the last three days sitting. The physical spaces the conference was held in were agreeably compactly laid out, so I didn't have do a lot of hiking down halls to go from one session to the next. But I feel like I've walked for miles.

I'm being cagey about the identity of the conference because of reasons. Suffice it to say I spent three days getting my radical on with people who, hmm, could be said to identify as "psychiatric survivors" – people whom the mental health system has done profound harm and violated their human rights – from around the world, many (most?) of whom might be described as activists and there in that capacity, some of whom are also clinicians or ex-clinicians or psychology researchers. Lots of very explicit intersectionalism and inclusivism. Very emotionally intense, super intellectually stimulating, enormously morally compelling.

Since the default assumption at the conference was that attendees were psychiatric survivors, I was "out" about not being a psychiatric survivor myself but a mental health professional and there as an ally. That was... a very hard experience to describe. To do such a thing, and do it ethically, is extremely demanding of energy, because it entails such a high level of self-monitoring and attention to others, at literally every second. Yet at the same time, it was so wildly validating of my ethical values as a person and a clinician, in ways I hadn't even realized I was hungry for, it felt very spiritually nourishing and emotionally supportive. I realized after the second day that just in the program book and in the presentations I'd attended, that I'd heard the word "humanistic" more times in those two days than I'd heard it used by anybody not me in the previous five years. Or maybe more. I'm a humanistic therapist, and I'm literally welling up again just reflecting on that, and how clinically-philosophically isolated this reveals me to have been. And, my god, the first, like, three times the term went zipping by I thought, Hey, do they know what that means, technically, to a therapist? Ah, they're probably just using it as a synonym for "humanely", as lay people usually do. And it became clear that, no, at least some of the people using the term really did mean it clinically. And I was like Oh. They don't need me to explain it to them. They already know. Which, is, like, the fundamental unit of being understood. Talk about your being called in from the cold.

I went to this conference thinking of myself as an ally, someone there to support another people as they do their thing – an in a really important sense, that is exactly right – but to my surprise, I discovered that these people, despite not being clinicians, were clinically my people. I wound up doing a hell of a lot more personal sharing than I would ever have expected – certainly vastly, vastly more than I have ever done in a mental health professionals context. It was like, I suddenly realized I was in an environment in which I could talk about how furious I am that I am forced to use diagnoses on patients without their consent, how frustrated I am by how the bureacratic systems in which I must work compromise the integrity of the treatment I try to provide, how disgusted I often am by the conduct of colleagues and mental health institutions (I discovered the wonderful expression, "psychiatric hate-speech"), how indignant I am at all sorts of idiocy and injustice and unfairness in the system – all the things I am so careful never to say because of how poorly my colleagues may take it. (Not my imagination: The last session I attended drew quite a number of clinicians, who were all "AND FOR ANOTHER THING!"; the presenter afterwards told me she had presented the same talk at a conference on the philosophy of psychiatry for an audience that was half psychiatrists, and, in contrast, they were furious with her for her temerity.)

I got to have conversations about capitalism and disability, culture and identity, the history of psychiatry, the history of nationalism, what you can and can't do inside the health care system, other countries' nationalized (or not, where mental health is concerned) health care, and how money affects mental health care; I heard a slew of what I would call "mental health radical coming out stories". I met someone who is as into the history of the DSM as I am, and someone who has written an academic article about the ethical and clinical problems of diagnosis. I got politely chewed out once, early on, for using oppressive language, and then immediately apologized to for it, them saying ruefully that they have "a chip on [their] shoulder" about mental health care professionals and shouldn't have talked to me like that, and I assured them I was there to be chewed out and have my vocabulary corrected and was fine with it; I'm pretty sure they were way more upset about what they said to me than I was, and I feel bad about putting them in that position by my ignorance – but we've exchanged phone numbers and I'm hoping I might yet make it up to them.

There was a point where somebody asked me something like whether I had been learning a lot at the conference so far, and I thought a moment and replied that I had, but, "I am at this conference not just to learn things. I am here because, as a person and a clinician, these are my values."

So it was an experience that was weirdly simultaneously hard and easy. If you had asked me four days ago I would have said that it's probably impossible for an experience to require a very high level of scrupulous self-monitoring and yet feel welcoming of and safe for emotional vulnerability and risktaking. Yet that was precisely my experience.

It was demanding and beautiful and powerful and huggy and astonishing and uplifting and I'm exhausted and weepy and have like twenty new best friends.
kjn: (Default)
[personal profile] kjn
Apart from Fantastika 2016 (where I edited the con newsletter), I have only had light duties at most cons I've been to recently. At Worldcon 75 I was the Area Head of childrens' programming. To make matters worse, my co-Area Head (and wife) [personal profile] thette had been battling exhaustion due to work for the year before the con, and busted her knee the Friday before the con started, so she had to strictly ration her work.

I'm not even that good with kids, especially when they are excited and in a group. Luckily, I had some excellent staffers, who did most of the work with keeping the kids happy, while I did most of the behind-the-scenes jobs. So this report is dedicated to Silja Lampela, Mia-Pia Asomäki, Katherine Catchpole, Marie Engfors, and Therese Norén, my excellent staffers. (Technically Katherine was "only" a volunteer, but as she joined our security briefing, I thought it simplest to just declare her a staffer as well.)

Pre-con travel and work )

Wednesday )

Thursday )

Friday )

Saturday )

Sunday )

Post-con )

Poem: "The Whole of Civilization"

Aug. 18th, 2017 05:05 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
This poem came out of the August 15, 2017 Poetry Fishbowl. It was inspired and sponsored by Anthony Barrette.

Read more... )

Bust of Lincoln Destroyed

Aug. 18th, 2017 04:27 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
So this happened

The same principle behind this leads to this and this.

I told you so.  I have been saying and saying that when a society starts pulling down statues, it tends to mushroom, because people get it in their heads they can destroy all the art they dislike.  Sure it's tempting.  Everybody loves to pull down something they hate and stomp on it.  That's very gratifying.  But it's a bad idea because it destroys the past and then nobody has nice things for a long time.  It also sucks when other people pull down stuff that YOU like just because THEY don't, and there is probably not one piece of art on the planet which is liked by everyone.  

Seriously, people, stop doing this shit.  Unpopular art can be moved to a place where it won't annoy folks, but destroying it is counter-civilization.

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Page generated Aug. 21st, 2017 02:43 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios