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Another busy Caturday

May. 24th, 2017 01:08 pm
madfilkentist: The Catmobile at Merrimack River Feline Rescue Society (Catmobile)
[personal profile] madfilkentist
Again, I thought I'd found all the cats when counting them for canned food servings. Later on, though, I spotted a white cat hiding behind the big rollable cage. When it got to time to sweep the floors, Virginia found three more hiding under it!

MozartChips and Trooper are now allowed to run loose, though they still have their own cages to retreat into. Gramma Tala and Endor are still there, but I got word that Endor is being adopted!

A tabby cat named Lunar is determined to get through any closed door. He ran downstairs at least four times. Cats aren't supposed to be allowed loose in the basement. Among other things, the intake room is down there, with cats who still haven't been checked for health.

Glee is still there, which surprised me. She's a very cute cat and extremely friendly.

I think I've mentioned Mozart (in the photo) before. He was brought up into the main room. He's miserable-looking but very nice. It took several tried for me to get a picture of him because he'd come right up to my phone while I was trying to photograph him. Unfortunately, other cats were picking fights with him, maybe because he looks scruffy. He's still eating a lot and trying to get up to a proper weight. That may help.

(no subject)

May. 23rd, 2017 09:06 pm
ellenmillion: (Default)
[personal profile] ellenmillion
I've done So. Much. Today.

I couldn't point a finger at anything individually grueling, and my to-do list wasn't really that impressive, but I feel like I haven't stopped all day, rushing from thing to thing. It is, at least, a nicer day than yesterday, with spots of sun, and batches of chocolate chip cookies.

I wrote no words today, but I did finish a commission and deliver it, and tweak it, and get it approved! Horrah!

It's pretty hilarious that Jake and I got each other early birthday presents of thermoses without collaborating on it. I got him a tiny 9 oz thermos for his coffee (he was lamenting not being able to find anything smaller than 12 oz), and he got me a thermos for nighttime ice water because I was jealous of the one he had. (I am excited to give him his second present, but his birthday isn't for another few days and he reads my blog, so I can't gush about what I found yet.)

Have a photo from last week when it was ridiculously sunny and hot:


We stopped for lunch at the Pita Place, which has AMAZING falafel, as a treat after the gym. Guppy enjoyed her hummus pita. I'm not sure what the L signifies, except that she was doing her best to be completely loony.

ETA: Woops, didn't post this last night. A great night of sleep later, and ready to tackle the to-do list that is no shorter than yesterday! *cracks knuckles*

ONE NATION, UNITED

May. 24th, 2017 12:21 pm
thnidu: 50 stripes, alternate red and white, radiating from a central point, and 13 blue stars in a circle. By me. (Glory Variation #2)
[personal profile] thnidu
From Quartz
 
The New Orleans mayor is here to remind us that no one is free until everyone is free

Photo caption:
A statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is lowered to a truck for removal Friday, May 19, 2017, from Lee Circle in New Orleans. The city council voted to remove the monument and three other Confederate and white supremacist monuments in Dec. 2015. An obelisk honoring the militia known as the White League was taken down in April; a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis was removed May 11; and a statue of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard was taken down on Wednesday.



The city of New Orleans has been making waves lately. After much debate, New Orleans decided to take down four Confederate monuments from around the city. On Friday (May 19), mayor Mitch Landrieu gave a speech about the decision, just hours before the last monument—depicting general Robert E. Lee—came down.

There’s no denying we’re living in a time of political turmoil, and people worldwide are faced with decisions about how they will act, either in resistance or peace. Still, it is striking how Landrieu chose to stay true to his values, in spite of opposition, and so eloquently explained his choice by detailing the history of the Confederacy and the cult of the Lost Cause of the Confederacy.

New Orleans is making an active effort to rewrite its history to be inclusive. You can watch the full speech and read the full transcript below:

Click headline for article, with video and transcript




Lena, in London. Day 30.

May. 24th, 2017 08:44 am
solarbird: (tracer)
[personal profile] solarbird

"Hey, doc!" The pilot waved her arms, and shouted across the square. "Angela!"

"Lena!" The doctor waved back in response, and walked quickly through the thin crowd. "It... it really is you. You look almost exactly the same."

"So do you!" The two women hugged, close. "Gor blimey, doc, it's been so long. You're the first person from the old team I've actually seen in person since Greece. How's Fareeha?"

Angela hugged the pilot again, and whispered into her ear, "I am certainly being surveilled, we should get to my office at the embassy" before leaning back, taking Tracer's shoulders in her hands as if everything were perfectly ordinary. "On a mission, like always. But we're both very well, thank you. I'll be back home with her again in a few days." She showed a decorated gold band on her ring finger. "It's our second anniversary."

"Oooh, nice," said Tracer, looking closely at the interweaved inlays, the halo and the hawk. "Very nice. I'm not surprised, though - you two weren't exactly subtle." She scrounged her pockets for cash. "Let me grab something from the takeaway and we can head over to your place. You don't mind, do you?"

"Of course not! I have the entire afternoon, go ahead." She gestured to the order window. "So tell me, how is life back in London?"

Tracer frowned, and ordered a vindaloo and joined the short queue for pickup. "I'm not alive yet," she said flatly. "Still trying to get that sorted."

"Still?" asked the doctor, confusedly.

"Yah, that's why I'm doing everything in cash. It's like being a tourist in my own home town. Still living in hostels, couldn't get work if I tried, it's just every-day all-day throw myself at another corner of military bureaucracy."

"That sounds terrible. Have you tried the civilian authorities?"

"Yeh, I gave up and submitted a bunch of forms earlier today. But if I could get the bleedin' forces to pay attention, I wouldn't have to. I'm an officer! This shouldn't be so difficult."

"Surely some sort of official status is better than none," said Angela.

"Not too sure about that, luv." Tracer's curry arrived, and she grabbed it, a couple of napkins, and her tea. Turning to go, she confessed, "Honestly, outside flying, outside Overwatch... I'm starting to wonder if I ever even had a life."

-----

"Sorry if this messes up any of your tests," said the pilot, putting away the last of her second lunch. "But I was ravenous. Happens a lot these days."

"Well, I won't be able to tell you much about cholesterol levels or blood sugar, but that's not exactly why we're here, is it? You look quite fit."

Lena just smiled, happy to be looking at anyone she recognised. "Bloody hell, it's good to see someone I know. Even if you were always just 'the doc.'"

Dr. Ziegler smiled professionally back. "Before you say anything else - anything else - authorise this." She offered the pilot a padd, with forms.

"What is it?"

"It confirms that I'm your doctor. Doctor-patient confidentiality is core to my organisation and we're prepared to defend it. I assure you, whatever I see or record, it will not go to the British - or Swiss - governments. We are on Swiss soil, and I am notoriously prickly."

"Brilliant." Tracer keyed her acceptance. The form even looked like an Overwatch document. It felt like being back at old home, and her heart ached a moment for it.

"And this document," the doctor changed pages, "is not standard. But it authorises me to share your data with Winston. He has legal standing with us in ways he does not in Britain." Tracer approved again.

"Now, we may talk freely. But clothing off, please. Let's get you looked over."

Lena threw her shirt and trousers off, onto the chair, revealing the intricate pattern of bands of light, blue or red or white, flowing across her body, from upper right shoulder to lower left leg.

Angela was visibly taken aback. "Gott in Himmel. It's beautiful. You are living art."

"Clever, innit? I can control how it looks," she said, and faded it to a series of thin lines across her skin. "But I wanted to show off."

"This is what it takes to keep you in time, then?"

"S-," ..ombra, she almost said, but did not quite, "Since I got pulled back, yah. There was an earlier version that just belted on, but it wasn't stable. I kept," she shuddered, a little, remembering the feeling, "trying to phase back out of time."

"One broken strap from vanishing? That does not sound like a good solution, no," offered Angela.

"I'd've lost the plot in a month from stress and lack of showers. Can't lose this, though - it's part of me." She ran the traces through a cycle of soft, calming blues. It reminded her of No, she thought to herself, leave it. "I tell people it's bioluminescent tattoo. The latest thing, in Greece! Everybody wants them now."

"I understand why." Dr. Ziegler selected a pair of scanners. "With your permission?"

Lena hesitated. "You sure this place isn't bugged?"

The doctor smiled, and nodded. "Quite sure."

-----

"Good morning, Winston," said the doctor, a week later.

"Angela," he said pleasantly, sipping at a cup of tea, one and a half seconds ago. "How are you this fine morning?"

"Quite well, thank you. I'm in Egypt; Fareeha's just off to work. I'm ready to transmit the data, if you're set up to receive it."

"Go ahead," said the scientist.

"Sending," she said, pressing confirm.

"How was she, in person?" he asked, as the progress metre slowly climbed.

"Physically well. She's in fantastic aerobic condition. She has some new scarring - in my opinion, almost certainly burns from the explosion. She lost a toe, and broke several bones, but I see nothing to worry about. On the whole, she had to have been remarkably lucky."

"But is she still herself, to you?"

"As far as I can tell, she is. But while were perfectly friendly, before - professional friends, yes? - I didn't know her like you did. I would miss subtleties." She looked thoughtful. "Even so... even to me, she seems very lonely."

Winston nodded, sadly. "I can't even imagine what she's been going through. If I could just get down there..."

"I think that would be good, if only it could be done." The doctor paused a moment, collecting her thoughts. "But to the larger question..."

"Don't say it."

Mercy smiled, as close to wickedly as she ever came, "the ten thousand pound gorilla in the room..."

"For the last time, Angela - I am not ten thousand pounds!" he huffed.

Angela giggled, the Swiss equivalent of a guffaw, and continued, "...the hardware itself. It's extraordinary. The shielding is perfect, and where it cannot be shielded, it is too fine for nondestructive deep scans. I could get nowhere with it."

"Damn," said the ape. "So we still don't even know what it does."

"Not so," she gestured with her left hand, "we know it's a chronal accelerator. Of that, I am sure. We just don't know what else it might do."

He put more sugar in his tea. "Like mind control."

The doctor drew in a deep breath. "No, I don't think so. The brain interfacing is all motor cortex and reflex. It's meticulous work - it had to have been grown into place - and the guiding was magnificent." She highlighted some of the interface points, and at each level further down, the integration became, if anything, more complete. "It is truly a part of her, as much as any other part of her body."

"Huh." Winston peered at data sets as the first files completed upload. "Like your nanites?"

"A different approach, but if anything," said Mercy, "moreso. Whoever did this - it's not new to them. They've been doing this. They have practice."

"You could replace someone's whole brain with these techniques, couldn't you," he said, grimly.

"Certainly. But you can also do that in a chair with a combination of drugs, conditioning, and high-precision electromagnetic fields, and not leave so much evidence." She leaned forward on her elbows, towards the screen. "I know what you're thinking. Amélie had nothing like this in her brain. Whatever has been done to your friend Lena - I think her mind is still her own."

"With respect, doctor, you thought that about Amélie. We all did."

Dr. Ziegler nodded, resolutely. "I still do."

[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 - 07:00

This book really needs to go on my To Be Read list! Gail Garriger has several intertwined paranormal/steampunky series. Romancing the Inventor tosses in a lesbian romance as well as a mad scientist. Oh, and vampires. Mustn't forget the vampires.

Imogene Hale is a lowly parlourmaid with a soul-crushing secret. Seeking solace, she takes work at a local hive, only to fall desperately in love with the amazing lady inventor the vampires are keeping in the potting shed. Genevieve Lefoux is heartsick, lonely, and French. With culture, class, and the lady herself set against the match, can Imogene and her duster overcome all odds and win Genevieve’s heart, or will the vampires suck both of them dry?


It can be hard to find mainstream SFF books with "incidental lesbians" -- lesbian characters in stories that aren't "about" sexuality. Books like Romancing the Inventor give me how that some day publishing will be a place where books like the Alpennia series could have found a home in mainstream SFF. In the mean time, if you love mainstream SFF but wish it had more queer women in it, check out Mother of Souls.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Major category: 
hrj: (Default)
[personal profile] hrj

This book really needs to go on my To Be Read list! Gail Garriger has several intertwined paranormal/steampunky series. Romancing the Invntor tosses in a lesbian romance as well as a mad scientist. Oh, and vampires. Mustn't forget the vampires.

Imogene Hale is a lowly parlourmaid with a soul-crushing secret. Seeking solace, she takes work at a local hive, only to fall desperately in love with the amazing lady inventor the vampires are keeping in the potting shed. Genevieve Lefoux is heartsick, lonely, and French. With culture, class, and the lady herself set against the match, can Imogene and her duster overcome all odds and win Genevieve’s heart, or will the vampires suck both of them dry?


It can be hard to find mainstream SFF books with "incidental lesbians" -- lesbian characters in stories that aren't "about" sexuality. Books like Romancing the Inventor give me how that some day publishing will be a place where books like the Alpennia series could have found a home in mainstream SFF. In the mean time, if you love mainstream SFF but wish it had more queer women in it, check out Mother of Souls.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Irregular Webcomic! #1569 Rerun

May. 24th, 2017 10:11 am
[syndicated profile] irregular_comic_rss3_feed
Comic #1569

This makes the second country that Steve has become king of.


2017-05-24 Rerun commentary: The first being Nigeria, of course. It's not at all unusual for someone to be the King or Queen of multiple countries. Queen Elizabeth II is currently Queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis.

dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Outside Interference
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 16 of ?
word count (story only): 1063


:: This story takes place the same day as “Insurance Salesmen,” picking up as Edwina arrives at work. This story will begin to make obvious and plot-critical connections between the earlier stories. I currently expect to wrap everything up within a total of twenty parts, around 25k words. ::


:: Pay Special Attention: Warnings will be listed by chapter, with the proper spoiler-cover on the index page and listing all necessary warnings. In this chapter, there is mention of injury to a child (the injury is perceived to be more serious than it is). Also, this is a promise from the author of a happy ending, because the plot is not about a missing shoe. ::


back to part fifteen
to the Voices of the Engines index
on to part seventeen




When the driver helped Mister Williams out of the carriage, it was Robertson who tucked himself under the man's arm and suggested he lift his knee instead of his heel. “Sports injuries can be made much worse by walking on them,” he explained softly. “Our coach taught us how to help each other off the field.”

“Edwina.” Mister Williams nodded toward the door. “Knock, but if you don't recognize the person who answers, or you think that something is… not right, pretend we are only stopping here to ask for directions.”

“Yessir,” she agreed, then raced across the lawn. Her skirts flung themselves about like autumn leaves, offering glimpses of the lace-trimmed petticoats beneath. She knocked hard at the door, grateful for the gloves covering her hands.

When the latch clicked, she stepped back.
Read more... )

Regaining Weight

May. 23rd, 2017 10:24 pm
liralen: Finch Painting (Default)
[personal profile] liralen
One of the interesting things was that when I first started down the competitive path, I lost about 15 pounds of weight from my high of about 172 lbs, during the worst of the stressful days of moderating. Then, over the course of the six months of competitive, I got down to about 150 lbs.

I'm not a small woman to begin with, I'm 5'9", and I did and still do construction, so 150 was kind of frightening. The only time I'd ever hit that weight since my late 20's was also during my moderatorship, when I'd gone four months on extreme stress and got to the point where I came down with vertigo before I could actually stop and rest for a week. I regained my weight fairly quickly with actual sleep and food.

I did that again.

Within two weeks of quitting competitive, where I was cooking again, lifting again, and went from doing about 3000 steps on average per day to doing about 7500 a day now, I got back up to 155. Now I'm at 158 and steady with the usual daily fluctuations as I had been before all these adventures. The interesting thing is that even with the weight gain, I still fit into my skinny clothes, so I suspect that a lot of the weight regaining was mostly muscle mass that had atrophied when I wasn't moving around all that much and forgetting to eat. I went from getting breathless just going for a walk to being able to do my usual three mile walk easily.

Read more... )

Child still sick. Now spouse sick.

May. 24th, 2017 12:15 am
archangelbeth: Woman doing a zombie "braaaaains" pose (Braaains!)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Spouse does not have kid's fever and running nose. Spouse has nausea and feeling terrible. I am currently the only functioning person in the house. ;_; Oh, and I got to bed at 4 in the morning again, last dark, and the alarm went off at 9:30 or so.

Red spot on arm where TICK WAS DIABLARIZING* ME is still red. No rash at this time.

It is trash night but I did not go down to sit and do the downstairs litterboxen because I am wearing black jeans and do not want to be SITTING down there when I might not be able to see the HORRIBLE TICK THINGS CRAWLING UP MY LEG.

My skin continues to crawl.

Havva Quote
It's a german word and some people can say it all german-ish. I'm an american doofus, so I say "hoogle culture". I had to spend some time with google to find the right spelling. Hugal, hoogal, huegal, hugel .... And I really like saying it out loud: "hugelkultur, hoogle culture, hoogal kulture ...." - it could be a chant or something.
--https://richsoil.com/hugelkultur/



INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )

So. M'kay.

May. 23rd, 2017 09:01 pm
lemmozine: (Default)
[personal profile] lemmozine
Today I went to lunch with a friend. That was my major accomplishment. I'm presently feeling like a bad metaphor regarding a cat and some horrendous thing being dragged by said cat.

I seem to have a room share for Contata. This is a good thing.

I am thinking about my current symptoms. Seems to be allergies/asthma, perhaps with a touch of bronchitis. If the cough pills I took don't settle it down, I'll try the inhaler.

Also thinking about plans for the rest of the week. For the next 3 days, those plans include setting up a Patreon and trying to enter a few hundred eBay listings. Saturday will be housecleaning and a housefilk in late afternoon. Sunday, I've set aside some time to promote the house concert I'm having in July. Then I'll be going to a local house concert in the evening.

Next week: Monday is both Memorial Day and JFK's 100th birthday. I'll probably do more ebay listings. Tuesday, more fundraising. Wednesday, I have end-of-month errands. Thursday, the first, I'll probably have to start shipping out eBay stuff, and see the chiropractor. Friday I have a podiatry visit and a hootenanny.

Saturday or Sunday, the 3rd and 4th, I'm hoping to get to the capitol hill people's fair. The evening of the 3rd I'm volunteering for a Bill Staines concert, my last volunteer effort for June.

For the rest of June up to Contata, my schedule is extremely light. Probably another doctor visit to get shots in my knees. A uke club meeting. Al Franken on his book tour.

So I have a LOT of time to work on my eBay sales and trying to get this Patreon off the ground. I've decided I want to do something slightly different with it. Sort of like one of those record clubs where people choose an option. The basic underlying focus will be daily youtube videos, alternating between filk, folk, songwriting, ukulele, and blues. The Monday to Friday videos will be available to everyone, but the weekend videos will be for patrons only.

I want to avoid copyright issues as much as I can.

I'm thinking "Five Worlds of Music" for a tentative title.

I may make some of the videos in advance and post them later, when I have busy days planned.

Some of the plans: I want to start off with a cover of "Drink Up the River" by Kathy Mar because it's perfect, and timelier than ever.

I want to do one video of not just a single song, but my entire set list for the concert I did in 2015, all played on 4 different 10 string instruments.

The first bonus, for everyone, when I reach a preset goal even with the money I won't be getting from Social Security due to yesterday's surprise, will be a PDF songbook containing nearly all my songs, hopefully with chords and keys. I've been working on that for a while now.

There are a few things I need to get done first, but I'm hoping to have the Patreon up by Friday or Monday.

And that's me.

Now, I'm about a month behind reading everyone else's journals, so that's next.

Burst of chores

May. 23rd, 2017 09:39 pm
catsittingstill: (Default)
[personal profile] catsittingstill
So every summer my Dad and my brother come over and stay with us for a couple of weeks. On our end this involves a lot of house cleaning and doing of various postponed chores. Which are beginning to happen now, because The Visit will be in about 2 1/2 weeks.

Chore 1: Mounting the stained glass window.

Last summer we commissioned a large stained glass "window" from David Green, a stained glass artist (mostly retired) in Oregon, and drove home with it. I had made a Most Excellent Crate (MEC 1.0 was goddammit a quarter inch too small to have room for window *and* padding, and MEC 2.0 had to be constructed in Dad's garage with Dad breathing down my neck because Dad can handle sharing a house with other people for about a week and we were on day 6) that was sturdy, had handles and was deftly designed into the 4 inches of spare space between the size of the window and the size of the inside of Kip's Prius C which is not a large car. I was rather proud of the MEC.

Mounting the stained glass artwork in our actual window was intimidating--it involved drilling through the mahogany window frame into the 2x6 header above it so I could screw in eye bolts, then using s hooks and chains to suspend the artwork by the 2 metal loops soldered at the top. So it took me quite some time to figure out what I was going to do, buy the hardware--finding a decent chain that was 1 strong and 2 nice looking took quite some time, for example--and I kind of ground to a halt and I set all the hardware on the windowsill but never got around to moving the MEC out of the rumpus room and into the living room to actually unpack it. Among other things, opening the crate would be the moment of truth where we found out if the MEC had actually done its job and got the window home undamaged, and also handling the window is a bit tricky; you have to be very careful how you pick it up and move it around because stained glass windows can destroy themselves under their own weight if you do it wrong.

However Kip and I wanted to have it up before Dad and Jake came, so last week we cleaned up the living room, moved the furniture around to get easy access to the window, and I actually drilled holes in the woodwork and mounted the eye bolts. I hooked up the S hooks and chains and then we took two of Kip's weights (30 lbs each) and hung them off the chains for 24 hours to be sure they would be strong enough to hold the artwork. (The artwork is only about 35 lbs, but I figured if the hardware could hold 60 lbs it could certainly hold 35.). The hardware held up fine, so Kip persuaded one of his co-workers to come over in the afternoon and help--the moving process is safer with 2 people to hold the window and one person to do up the hooks. That went very smoothly except it turned out that the artwork was best positioned in the window if I didn't use the chain--just the S hooks to connect the loops on the artwork with the eye bolts in the window frame. So okay, I have some chandelier chain if anyone wants it. Going cheap, because I don't think I can return it.

The artwork looks fantastic, by the way. I have several pictures under different lighting conditions. The down side is that now the living room has a lot less privacy. You can't really see through the artwork because even where the glass is clear it's still wavy. That was what we wanted; I hate feeling like people can watch me at night. But the paper shades we'd been using as window curtains don't provide full coverage anymore. We had to take one down to put up the artwork, and the artwork is a little narrower than that shade was so there's about a six inch gap.

Chore 2 arranging for new blinds

However we'd been planning to get nice wooden blinds for the windows. Which I'd also been putting off, because we didn't want to do that until we had the artwork up. So yesterday I called a couple of places about coming to give us an estimate. One place got right back to me, the other hasn't, even though I called again today. I guess they are not very interested in our business, so I'll pick another place and give them a call.

Chore 3 getting new bulbs

Last week I ordered a bunch of puck lights (GX53 bulbs) for our under cabinet lights because we'd had several lights burn out and I was out of the dozen spare bulbs I'd bought when I got the under cabinet lighting in the first place. I actually called the company to order more because I couldn't find them at the local hardware store, and I was quite unhappy when they told me they didn't make them anymore, because I thought I was going to have to replace all the fixtures. However it turned out GX53 is a type of bulb that several companies make, so I went online and ordered a set of four LED GX53s from Amazon. The LED bulbs arrived yesterday, and I replaced the 2 burnt out bulbs and they switch on immediately, (the CFLs have that fluorescent second where you wonder if the light switch is working) and they are quite a bit brighter (but their lighting pattern isn't as even) and they don't get as warm, so win. I ordered another set of four.

Chore 4 (cluster)

Yesterday I also did a bunch of dishes, got a new toilet seat for one of the toilets and put it on, scrubbed the bathtub and the bathroom sink, and put our pull-down sprayer attachment for our kitchen sink in several bowls of vinegar until it would spray properly again.

Chore 5 making a rack for Kip's weights

Today I did library music in the morning, then Skyped with Dad to work on Dutch, and then I designed a rack for Kip's weightlifting weights, bought wood for it and cut out most of the pieces. Kip's weights right now take up a fair amount of floor space and I think I want that floor space back and the rack is the easiest way to make that happen. It will be clunky and ugly, made out of 2 x 4s and re-used plywood from MEC 1.0. (MEC 2.0 may become a spare worktable top; I haven't decided). But the parts are cheap and I think I'll be able to finish it in a couple of days.

And for the Resistance I went to the Truth or Trump demonstration on Friday, phone banked on Sunday for Julie Byrd Ashworth for Tennessee House of Representatives, and I have signed up to canvass for John Ossof for GA-06 2 weekends from now.

Brocelïande coming to Pasadena!

May. 23rd, 2017 04:22 pm
kayshapero: (Default)
[personal profile] kayshapero posting in [community profile] filk
Well, certainly beats Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane... :) But seriously, to the handful of you out there who don't already know about them, this is one group well worth listening to. Here's the latest update.

We want to let you know about our June shows (there are 2!) so here's the word. We welcome back Brocelïande in two weeks for their fourth appearance at Caltech, on Saturday, June 3 in Beckman Institute Auditorium (Little Beckman.) This Bay area trio consists of Margaret Davis, Kristoph Klover, and Kris Yenney, and between them they cover 3-part vocals, with Celtic harp, guitar, cello, octave mandolin, recorders, Swedish nyckelharpa, flute, and more! Their performances include music from the British Isles, Medieval and Renaissance music, and original settings of the songs of J.R.R. Tolkien. They cover a lot of ground, and their shows are like no other act we have presented. Sample their music with Santa Maria/ Cantiga This program is your chance to hear Kris play the only “Hardanger cello d’Amore” in existence! We look forward to seeing you at this show!

Tickets for the show are $20 for adults and $5 for Caltech students and children. You can order them on the phone by calling the Caltech Ticket Office at (626) 395-4652. Online tickets are available here until the end of Thursday May 11. There is a service charge for online and phone tickets, but you can buy tickets without a service charge by visiting the Ticket Office in person or by purchasing them at the door on the night of the show. The Caltech Ticket Office is now in their new location at 1200 E. California Boulevard in Pasadena (Southeast corner of Wilson Avenue). Their usual hours are 9AM - 4PM, Monday through Friday. There is limited short term parking in front of the four story Spalding building on California Boulevard (note the yellow curb and the sign that indicates 15 minute parking for the Post Office station inside) Otherwise, you can look for street parking nearby. They are located just inside the door on the east side of the building, to the left of the entrance.

Read more... )


commodorified: very worried stuffed crocodile clutching a pillow (not coping)
[personal profile] commodorified
Since I'm half-packed and we're leaving in less than 24 hours it's probably time to announce that I am coming to WisCon. (Now watch me wake up tomorrow with Lorayne's cold or something.)

I'm not signed up for any panels, I'm not volunteering this year. I'm not 100 percent sure that this isn't going to end in disaster again. Depending on how I react to the various allergens in Madison I may be very low-energy, I may be sneezy and stuffed-up, I may be spending a lot of time asleep, I may be slow and forgetful due to being low oxygen, I may recuse myself rapidly from controversy or trouble if I don't see an immediate way to be useful.

I may have to leave panels abruptly due to coughing fits. We may be leaving town abruptly to get me back to Canada for treatment. (My out-of-province insurance isn't going to cover me for another serious asthma event in the same damn' city as the last one. That's kind of the definition of 'pre-existing'). We have a plan for this. It's as solid as we can make it.

Or we may have trouble at the border and not get there at all.

Or it all may be just fine. I really don't know. There's no way to tell.

But I'm on a new med (Singulair), and taking ALL the other ones, religiously, and so far my lungs seem to be willing to stay fairly functional. I'm bringing my bike. I'm hoping to stay an extra week and see friends. I'm cautiously optomistic.

A small request: if you see me, and we're friends, and you possibly can, grab me for coffee or food or a quick chat? This is almost certainly my last WisCon for some time, and if I do have a dangerous reaction, it's my last WisCon, period.

I know that I've lost touch with a lot of you due to missing the con and generally being offline and preoccupied trying to get my health under control. I'm sorry about it, and I'd really like to connect this weekend if we can, because you all are one of the communities of my heart, and to be honest I'm coming much more for y'all than for the "official" con.

If you or someone near you is wearing scent, I may have to back away rapidly. I'm sorry.

I'm not really accustomed to being a fragile little flower, you know? I'm still working out how to handle it.

Also, if there's a volunteer task I can do, something you need help with, that you can grab me for on the spot, please do. It's hard to contribute meaningfully when you can't make any promises, and I'll appreciate any chances to do so.

for the techies: exiting vim

May. 23rd, 2017 05:21 pm
cellio: (don't panic)
[personal profile] cellio

I once heard a quip that went something like this:

"I used vi for a couple years."
"Yeah, I couldn't figure out how to exit, either."

I admit that the first time I was unwittingly thrown into the vi editor (predecessor to vim), I had to kill the process from another terminal (yes, terminal). So I was amused to see this blog post today: Stack Overflow: Helping One Million Developers Exit Vim.

In the last year, How to exit the Vim editor has made up about .005% of question traffic: that is, one out of every 20,000 visits to Stack Overflow questions. That means during peak traffic hours on weekdays, there are about 80 people per hour that need help getting out of Vim.

The point of the post isn't actually to bash vim, though it humorously acknowledges the widespread problem (and c'mon, you have to do it a little). Mostly they analyze data about who is presumably getting stuck in vim, complete with charts and stuff. Enjoy.

Tuesday Yardening

May. 23rd, 2017 04:23 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today is mild and cloudy. 

Round 1, we picked up sticks along the sidewalk by the house.

Washington hawthorn and red-twig dogwood are blooming.

Round 2, I cut weeds from the septic garden and trimmed grass from around the goddess garden.

Trumping Math

May. 23rd, 2017 03:30 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
I'm lucky if I can get the same answer three times running on a calculator.  But on college entrance exams, I scored 66% nationally.  That means 2/3 of people are worse at math than I am.  Somehow.

I'm often appalled at how many of those people seem to work in economics and government.  I mean really.  I could do better than this.  >_<

Skiffy and Fanty Signal Boost Podcast

May. 23rd, 2017 06:51 pm
[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 11:51

The SFF podcast Skiffy and Fanty interviewed me for their "Signal Boost" series and the show is now live. Check it out! I talk about the Alpennia series as well as the Lesbian Historic Motif Project. This is a really fun podcast show and you should consider subscribing to it.

Major category: 

Skiffy and Fanty Signal Boost Podcast

May. 23rd, 2017 11:50 am
hrj: (Default)
[personal profile] hrj

The SFF podcast Skiffy and Fanty interviewed me for their "Signal Boost" series and the show is now live. Check it out! I talk about the Alpennia series as well as the Lesbian Historic Motif Project. This is a really fun podcast show and you should consider subscribing to it.

annathepiper: (Little Help?)
[personal profile] annathepiper

Any of you who have followed me on a regular basis know that my household are longstanding fans of Folklife, the big four-day music festival that happens every year at the Seattle Center over Memorial Day weekend. This year’s is imminent, and as always, Dara, Paul, and I are looking forward to spending time there.

But I noted with dismay this morning that the Seattle Times has an article up saying that unless they get more donations at the gate this year, next year’s festival is in danger of being canceled. 🙁

According to that article, Folklife usually only gets donations from about 17 percent of attendees at the gate, and they take in around $190,000. They really need to bump that number up to $350,000 in order to afford next year.

So if you’re in the area, you love Folklife and what it brings to our local culture, and you’re planning to go this weekend, please please please donate anything you can spare at the gate. They need your help. Also, if you’re not going to be able to hit the festival but you still want to help out, you can donate to them directly on their website.

Please spread the word to other area locals! And if you’re going to be at the festival, hey, look for Dara and Paul and me, and say hi if you see us!

Mirrored from angelahighland.com.

solarbird: (tracer)
[personal profile] solarbird

"Heya, Winston!"

"Lena! It's been weeks - it's so good to see you," he replied, with a three second delay. "Are you okay? At least you're on the ground this time - where are you?"

"Brighton! Can't you hear - oh, I've got background noise filtering turned on, let me fix that." And the sound of the ocean appeared around her in Winston's feed. "It's cold, but I'm on the beach. Look!" She aimed the camera to the sea.

"It's March and it's not even raining! How about that," came Winston's voice, clearly, over the small speaker. "Is Amélie there? Or any of her friends? "

"Nope!" she chirped, turning the transmitter back around and walking with it. "It's just me, all by myself, kicking around old haunts."

"You're... out, then?"

"Yep. Entirely on me own, footloose and fancy free, walking the earth - or at least this beach - with no way to be found. Nobody even knows who or where I am - except you, I s'pose."

She didn't mention the retrieval beacon in her bag.

"I'm staying a couple of nights in a hostel, a few blocks in. It's cheap! And nice. But mostly, cheap."

"Off-season like this, I'd hope so." The scientist discreetly zoomed his viewscreen and scrolled around, looking for anything out of place in the background. Nothing obvious. "So... Talon just let you leave."

"Sure did. Helped me arrange my story and flew me out."

He leaned forward, and said, conspiratorially and low, "You haven't assassinated anyone yet, have you?"

Tracer laughed. "Only because I can't catch a shuttle to the moon, y'big ape. Which way do you want to go - pummellings or too much peanut butter?"

"Oh, peanut butter, definitely." He put on his best, big, toothy grin, which he let drop to a more genuine smile as a small popup window confirmed, Signal origin: south coast of England (probability 93%), Brighton Beach (probability 77%). "They really just... let you go."

"Yep. I said I needed to go find my old life, and Amélie made it happen." She bit her lower lip. "It's like she even agreed."

"Are you... alive again? Legally, I mean? Do you have money? Did they re-activate your commission?" Location probabilities climbed as more signal data arrived, and Winston dismissed the window. Good enough, he thought.

The smile Lena had been keeping propped up fell. "I'm... still working on that. After they cleared me at the consulate and helped me hitch onto a cargo flight home, I thought it would be easy. I kind of thought I'd be snapped up at Heathrow for debriefing, really. But... I wasn't. I just can't seem to get anybody's attention."

The pilot sat down on the top of a breakwater, propped up the transmitter, picked up a rock, and threw the latter towards the waves. "It's like I'm some kind of ghost."

"That's very strange," he granted. "Overwatch has been out of the news for a couple of years now, but - take it from me - the governments are still keeping tabs on everyone."

"Yeh. But it's fine, honestly!" It wasn't fine, but she managed to mean it through sheer sunny determination nonetheless. She turned back to the camera. "I've got enough money to live on for weeks - a few months, if I'm careful. So I thought, well, I just need to get out of London, right? Take a few days by the ocean, get some of that sea air. Get my head cleared up."

Partial retina image capture, said another, discreet popup. Image quality acceptable. Match probability 96%, margin of error +/-35%. "That accelerator they built you - how's it holding up?" He pursed his lips and shook his head. "I wish they'd used mine," he grumbled.

"Oh, it's absolutely wizard! Once I got the swing of it? Natural as breathing. I'll show you some time, I promise!"

Far away under the surface of the moon, in the research station now again his home, Winston the scientist studied Tracer's face for any hint, any sign, of the kind of programming he believed had been implanted into Amélie Lacroix. Face and voice analytics ran over and through every frame of vision and every millisecond of audio, searching for some hint, some breath of change, and found nothing.

Of course, they'd found nothing with Amélie either. But they'd had less reason to look.

I need someone actually there, he decided. "Lena, would you let me tell Angela you're back, and safe? I'd feel better if she checked you over herself. In person."

The pilot nodded enthusiastically, throwing another stone into the sea. "Let's! I'll be back to it on Monday, trying to get someone to listen to me. It'd be great to have someone from the old crew around to chat." She picked up a little stick of driftwood, and poked at more beach rocks, turning them over, seeing what was underneath. Generally, that meant more rocks. "To be honest, it's been kind of lonely. Funny, innit? Me? Lonely?"

"Haven't you looked up any old friends?"

"Oh, I've looked 'em up all right. It's a military life, though - most everybody I can find's been all moved 'round. Katarina's back in Norway, my graduating class have completely dispersed - a lot of 'em are in Greece, but I don't have the money to fly anywhere. The only one I found still in London was Imogen."

"That's too bad. I'd transfer you some money, if I could. But at least you found her."

"Yeah..." she said, sadly.

"uh oh."

Adequate data received to begin deep analysis, said the popup. Winston deactivated additional notifications.

"It was..." She looked for other words to describe it, and came up with nothing better than, "...it was weird, big guy. We were great friends in flight school, and we kept in touch when I jumped to Overwatch. And now, I'm... I'm literally back from the dead, least as far as she's concerned, and she won't even talk to me."

"That's awful!"

"She recognised me, I'm sure of it. She said she didn't, but I know she did. She said she didn't even remember knowing anyone who joined up with Overwatch." Tracer looked off to the side, not liking where her thoughts went. "She looked scared, Winston. Of me."

I can understand why, he thought to himself. The woman whose death brought down Overwatch is back from the grave, hasn't aged a day, and nobody is talking about it - who knows what you are? But out loud, he said, "I'm sorry," and meant it.

"It's been five years, the world's a different place - it feels like wheels are flying off everywhere, it really does - but now look out everyone, Tracer's coming to town! I thought..." her voice trailed off.

"Those missing five years didn't sink in, did they?"

They really hadn't, she knew. Not until then. "I really miss you, big guy," she said, sad and quiet.

"I've missed you too, Lena," he answered, softly. "I can't get off this rock, but you can always - any time of the day - radio me, and I'll listen." He reached over and touched a few points on a console. "I'm sending you my 'wakeup' prefix code. It will get me up, if I'm here, and I will answer."

Her padd chirped. "Got it."

"And don't wait 'till you're back in Brighton. Any time. Day or night."

"I will, I will! But maybe not tomorrow." She shook her head, brushing off the sadness. "There's a bar just a bit down the way, and it's also just hit me that I haven't picked anyone up in a bar in over five years, and that can't be helping. I think I'm gonna fix that tonight."

Winston howled with laughter, big honking bellows. "Now that sounds like the old Tracer," he said, merrily. "But... how're you going to explain the accelerator?"

"What, you think I've got some bulky ring in my chest, like yours? These are posh, mate!" She grinned. "I figured it out on the flight north. I just call 'em bioluminescent tattoos, and all the girls will want their own."

"Heh," he chuffed. "I believe the traditional Air Force benediction is, 'Good hunting?'"

"Rwrar." She winked.

"Go get 'em, pilot. But promise you'll radio me from London on Monday."

"I will, Winston. I promise."

Winston waited 'till Lena shut down her transmitter, and then threw the whole conversation - sound, vision, raw signal, transmission detail data, everything - into deep computational processing, to send along to Dr. Ziegler. If they've done anything to you, he thought, I will find it. And one way or another, somehow - they will pay.

[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 07:00

I pulled the titles to include in this blog series from a variety of sources: SFF lists, lesfic lists, LGBTQ lists. I don't exactly remember where I turned up Cristina Sánchez-Andrade's The Winterlings. From the blurb, it could have been any of several. The description sounds as if it's being pitched as a "literary novel" (in the genre sense) but I most likely found it recommended in an SFF context.

Galicia, Spain’s northwest region, in the 1950s. After a childhood in exile, two sisters return to their grandfather’s cottage for the first time since his shocking murder during the civil war. “The Winterlings” try to keep their dark secrets buried and carve out a peaceful existence in Tierra de Chá, an idyllic village host to a cast of grotesque but charming characters: a powerful psychic, a madman who believes he is a bus, a woman who refuses to die and the obese priest who heaves up a steep hill each day to give her last rites, a cross-dressing dentist who plants the teeth of the deceased in his patients’ mouths. Tension mounts when the sisters, once united by their passion for Hollywood cinema, compete for the chance to stand in for Ava Gardner in the nearby filming of Pandora and the Flying Dutchman. Meanwhile, a mutual suspicion develops between the mysterious sisters and the eccentric villagers: Why have the women returned, and what are they hiding? What perverse business arrangement did the townspeople make with their grandfather, and why won’t they speak of his death? Enchanting as a spell, The Winterlings blends Spanish oral tradition, Latin American magic realism, and the American gothic fiction of Flannery O’Connor and Shirley Jackson into an intoxicating story of romance, violent history, and the mysterious forces that move us.


Sometimes categorization of books can be confusing...or even feel misleading. Readers rarely approach a book without a "reading protocol" (to use Samuel Delany's term). Should The Winterlings be read through a fantasy lens? A magical realist lens? Or simply as a realistic story that may surprise you? The Alpennia novels have a tendency to confound expected reading protocols, whether the reader expects a romance novel, a lesfic novel, a swashbuckling fantasy, or a tale of magic. Mother of Souls breaks even the tenuous expectation of a romance plot that the previous books offered. If I could advise readers, I'd beg them to read Alpennia simply as stories of complex human beings, seeking purpose, connection, and community. If you find love, magic, and adventure, consider it a bonus.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Major category: 
hrj: (Default)
[personal profile] hrj

I pulled the titles to include in this blog series from a variety of sources: SFF lists, lesfic lists, LGBTQ lists. I don't exactly remember where I turned up Cristina Sánchez-Andrade's The Winterlings. From the blurb, it could have been any of several. The description sounds as if it's being pitched as a "literary novel" (in the genre sense) but I most likely found it recommended in an SFF context.

Galicia, Spain’s northwest region, in the 1950s. After a childhood in exile, two sisters return to their grandfather’s cottage for the first time since his shocking murder during the civil war. “The Winterlings” try to keep their dark secrets buried and carve out a peaceful existence in Tierra de Chá, an idyllic village host to a cast of grotesque but charming characters: a powerful psychic, a madman who believes he is a bus, a woman who refuses to die and the obese priest who heaves up a steep hill each day to give her last rites, a cross-dressing dentist who plants the teeth of the deceased in his patients’ mouths. Tension mounts when the sisters, once united by their passion for Hollywood cinema, compete for the chance to stand in for Ava Gardner in the nearby filming of Pandora and the Flying Dutchman. Meanwhile, a mutual suspicion develops between the mysterious sisters and the eccentric villagers: Why have the women returned, and what are they hiding? What perverse business arrangement did the townspeople make with their grandfather, and why won’t they speak of his death? Enchanting as a spell, The Winterlings blends Spanish oral tradition, Latin American magic realism, and the American gothic fiction of Flannery O’Connor and Shirley Jackson into an intoxicating story of romance, violent history, and the mysterious forces that move us.


Sometimes categorization of books can be confusing...or even feel misleading. Readers rarely approach a book without a "reading protocol" (to use Samuel Delany's term). Should The Winterlings be read through a fantasy lens? A magical realist lens? Or simply as a realistic story that may surprise you? The Alpennia novels have a tendency to confound expected reading protocols, whether the reader expects a romance novel, a lesfic novel, a swashbuckling fantasy, or a tale of magic. Mother of Souls breaks even the tenuous expectation of a romance plot that the previous books offered. If I could advise readers, I'd beg them to read Alpennia simply as stories of complex human beings, seeking purpose, connection, and community. If you find love, magic, and adventure, consider it a bonus.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Irregular Webcomic! #3664

May. 23rd, 2017 10:11 am
[syndicated profile] irregular_comic_rss3_feed
Comic #3664

Anyone who's ever sat on a metal seat early on a winter morning knows exactly what this feels like. I figured there must be some London railway stations with metal seats, so searched to see if I could find some, and lo, there were! East Croydon also popped up in the search results, but the seats at King's Cross[1] seem to have some particular infamy, with dozens of negative reviews and comments about them, so I used those. [1] I find it really difficult typing "King's Cross" with an apostrophe. Usage in London is in fact inconsistent, with forms both with and without an apostrophe being used. The name does derive from a possessive, coming from a reference to a monument to King George IV which stood in the area from 1830 to 1845. So by normal rules of English, it should have an apostrophe. However, place names don't always follow normal rules of English. In fact, here in Australia, the Geographical Names Board of New South Wales, which officially approves and lists all geographical names in the state (including street names), has an explicit rule that apostrophes are not allowed in place names. So the Kings Cross in Sydney is always spelt without an apostrophe, and that's the way I'm used to seeing it.

moem: Animated pic of Little Mole reading a book (molletje leest)
[personal profile] moem
Azuki, a BookCrossing friend of mine, posted the following in the BookCrossing forums. I'm helping her spread the word. Azuki, take it away:

Here's a little appeal: An indie used bookstore in Hong Kong is facing some financial hardship and is doing a fundraising. I'm spreading the word and hope that they can reach the goal to keep from foreclosure.  It's a very nice store, the type where the owner remembers the customers' name and preferences, and the article mentioned how sometimes the owner will give free books to a customer if they can't afford it, or leaves a message on the inside page for his customers: “May I borrow your reading time?”

A little intro about the bookstore:

A news article:

And the fundraising page:


Please help me spread the word if you think someone else may be interested. Thank you so much!!
dialecticdreamer: My work (Default)
[personal profile] dialecticdreamer
Outside Interference
by Dialecticdreamer/Sarah Williams
part 15 of ?
word count (story only): 1217


:: This story takes place the same day as “Insurance Salesmen,” picking up as Edwina arrives at work. This story will begin to make obvious and plot-critical connections between the earlier stories. I currently expect to wrap everything up within a total of twenty parts, around 25k words. ::


:: Pay Special Attention: Warnings will be listed by chapter, with the proper spoiler-cover on the index page and listing all necessary warnings. In this chapter, explanations and a few more complications tangle with each other. Also, this is a promise from the author of a happy ending, because the plot is not about a missing shoe. ::


back to part fourteen
to the Voices of the Engines index
on to part sixteen




Silent, Mister Williams seemed to rake his eyes down the young man's figure, sifting for information. Robertson squirmed under the gaze. “What?” the younger man finally blurted.

“They aimed for you. They wanted you, and they knew enough of your description that they didn't go for the driver after losing the coachman,” David Williams answered dryly. “Would you care to speculate why?”

Robertson looked toward the window, shaking his head. “No.”

“N-now he c-c-can k-k-keep a secret?” Leland clenched his fists in his lap. “If my n-niece is hurt--” He broke off, shaking at another strand of worry like a colt trying to shake its first harness.

“He's right,” Edwina agreed with a growl. “You insisted that you know codes and stations on the Underground Railroad, in front of me. You insinuated, quite absurdly, that Leland is part of that network.”

“So? It could just be idle conversation!” Robertson lifted his hands, as though about to gesture in the compressed space, but dropped them into his lap again.

“N-no one t-t-talks about the Railroad,” Leland insisted, “especially when t-t-they are in it.”
Read more... )

THE TICK WAS NOT VACUUMED

May. 23rd, 2017 01:15 am
archangelbeth: Illustration of a white cat jumping up with its fur standing out and eyes bugged; character is Krosp, from Girl Genius (Krosp EEK!)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Either that, or it had a friend. When I finally started getting ready for bed, at 4 in the morning (...kid had insomnia and is extrovert so stress = need a person), I took off my shirt and THERE WAS A TICK WITH ITS HEAD IN MY ARM. *SCREAM SCREAM SCREAM*

Except not screaming because not waking up kid.

So I went and whined "wake up wake up wake up" to my spouse, while holding a paper towel over the TICK THAT WAS SUCKING MY BLOOD ON MY ARM, and told him what the problem was and that I needed it gone and I couldn't make it gone help help help. So he got the tick-removal scoop that we had downstairs (I did not know where it was, for one), and got the thing off and we put it in an empty pill bottle that I had and there was rubbing alcohol on it and peroxide for my arm and I finished having screamings and now there is so much screaming still in my head and I itch all over now because psychosomatic.

Oh, and waiting to see if it turns into a rash. It was probably a large common brown dog tick, and not likely to carry Lyme and it's the wrong area for Rocky Mountain Fever, and it was only on for a few hours, BUT STILL.

*cries*

In other news: kid still sick, but getting better. We went to the library today for a wee bit, and kid got started on the Open Ended Question of Doom (compare and contrast characters X and Y from book Z; identities changed to prevent people from making cogent suggestions the kid might read), and then we came back home and did Long Drive.

I got some editing done, but I swear, I get halfway into things and then people come disrupt my train of thought and try to make me deal with things and I have to snarl at the other adult in the room. I AM ACTUALLY TRYING TO DO A THING DAMMIT.

Havva Quote
I've been reading up on the local soil and poring over historical maps. This sort of thing is weirdly fun for me, but it's a bit late to switch careers to agronomy and also my agent would nail my head to her wall as a warning to other authors.
-- http://tkingfisher.dreamwidth.org/1487134.html



INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )

Funny T-shirt

May. 22nd, 2017 06:54 pm
johnpalmer: (Default)
[personal profile] johnpalmer
I hope even a Trump supporter could admit that, okay, it's funny. Maybe unfair, untrue, etc., but *funny*.

https://www.balloon-juice.com/2017/05/22/my-new-t-shirt-came/

Monday Yardening

May. 22nd, 2017 07:51 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Cartoon of me in Wordsmith persona (Default)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Today has been cool and breezy.

Round 1, we picked up sticks in the ritual meadow.

Round 2, I watered potted plants on the porch.

Round 3, I planted moonflowers in the barrel garden and the support wire for the telephone pole.  I also put more morning glory seeds around the wire.  Then I trimmed grass around the wagonwheel garden.

This afternoon we went out to Harbor Freight and bought a convertible handtruck (it can go on two wheels or four), a toolkit with a very nice assortment of items, and a moving blanket (which doubles as a picnic blanket).  :D 
ellenmillion: (Default)
[personal profile] ellenmillion
The battle of the dill ended in retreat - I took the single straggly stem that survived their last onslaught and planted it in a hanging basket. TRY TO GET IT NOW, YOU GERBIL WANNABES.

I also got some lettuce starts, and now I have salad baskets that are safely out of their reach. (Last summer, I tried planting lettuce and it was gone in a day.) I also planted a few potato buckets, so hopefully we'll get a few dozen red potatoes in the fall.

The weekend was pretty well lost to a garage sale, which was wonderful for getting rid of stuff and also put a few hundred dollars in my pocket. We could not have picked a better weekend - it was sunny and warm, with just enough of a breeze to keep mosquitoes down but not blow anything around. For clutter reduction, it was absolutely wonderful - I got rid of our crib/toddler bed, a dresser, an old chair, a sleeping bag, a set of skis, a bunch of clothing, shoes I'll never wear... just stuff. So much stuff.

The people-watching was amazing. People bargained much less than I expected.

Today, it rains. I cleaned up Guppy's bedroom, and did my chores, took some trash into town, got a load of water, and picked up the mail. After three days of no writing, I did get a little over 1000 words in an hour, so hopefully I can get caught up again. I have a piece of artwork for finish for a client first, though, and bellydance tonight.

Today's artwork is a serious throwback. Like 21 years, throwback. I did this design in 1996 for Denali Science Camp, where I was a junior counselor. So many awesome memories!



Now I have a pile of dishes to wash, and some chicken to cut up and cook for a pot pie tomorrow.

Positive/Negative

May. 22nd, 2017 03:58 pm
lemmozine: (Default)
[personal profile] lemmozine
Positive: I tried to "friend" a noted SF author who already had reached his friends limit on Facebook. We were having a conversation in a group. It didn't work. About 10 minutes later, I got a friend request from that same author.

Negative: I got a call from Social Security. Turns out I'm impacted by an offset intended to harm double-dipping government employees. For 13 years I had a private retirement account in place of SS. My money nearly vanished just after the economy crashed in 2001. Because I then switched everything to safe money market funds, the recovery didn't do much. I had to cash in what was left in 2011, and that's gone. But because I get a 1700 a month pension, and didn't contribute to SS for 13 years, my SS is cut just about in half. So instead of a neasly 600-something I will get a measly 300 something.

I need to get to work on my upcoming Patreon. And eBay.

Read "To Know After Absence"

May. 22nd, 2017 04:45 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Damask smiling over their shoulder (polychrome)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
The poem "To Know After Absence" is now open for microfunding, and locked at the sale price.  Boss White introduces Shiv to the apartment above Blues Moon.

The Heart

May. 22nd, 2017 05:44 pm
wcg: (Default)
[personal profile] wcg
If you listen to podcasts, and are of a sex positive bent, you should check out The Heart. It's part of the Radiotopia family of podcasts, and it's really, really good. I could listen to Kaitlin Prest read the phone book, but what she's actually saying is much more evocative.

Warring fannish emotions

May. 22nd, 2017 02:08 pm
kshandra: figurine of a teddybear seated at an office desk, looking at a computer (Default)
[personal profile] kshandra
Load-in for BayCon starts on Thursday, and over on the Book of Face I'm starting to see desperate pleas from friends looking for people to work in their departments (including one person who, despite every attempt to avoid same, found out at the final staff meeting that they are running their department).

And I'm torn between feeling bad for my friends and wanting to help out...and schadenfreude that I got the fuck out when I did.

someone needs to say it

May. 22nd, 2017 01:57 pm
solarbird: (korra-smug)
[personal profile] solarbird

Monday Update 5-22-17

May. 22nd, 2017 02:04 pm
ysabetwordsmith: Artwork of the wordsmith typing. (typing)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
These are some posts from the later part of last week in case you missed them:
Poem: "13 Reasons Why"
Sunday Yardening
Poem: "A Conversation Between Body and Soul"
Peppers Without Heat
New Hottest Pepper
Poem: "The Key to Your New Home"
Poem: "Blue Jeans and Jazz"
Poem: "All These Things Woven into Something"
Saturday Yardening
Poem: "A Matter of Opportunity"
Thursday Yardening
Migrating Trees
Wednesday Yardening


The half-price sale in Shiv is now complete. Three new poems have been sponsored and posted in full. I still need to start a new epic with a partial payment that came in late last night.

The [community profile] crowdfunding Creative Jam ran this weekend on a theme of "Baker's Dozen." See my activities.


Poetry in Microfunding:
"A Hope and a Promise" belongs to Polychrome Heroics.  Aidan and Mrs. Ozenne discuss secure attachment.  "Essential for Human Survival" belongs to Polychrome Heroics: Cassandra.  Groundhog and Cassandra explore the snack room.  "The Inner Transition" belongs to Polychrome Heroics: Berettaflies.  Valor's Widow finds out what Stylet has in his backpack.

Weather has been intermittently wet but is drying out now.  Today is sunny with a little breeze.  There is standing water in the fields again.   The mourning dove nest under the kitchen window on the porch still has two white eggs.  Currently blooming: violets, dandelions, honeysuckle, spiderwort, carnations, marigolds, petunias, lantana, million bells, snapdragons, zinnias, chives, white globe allium, firecracker plant, torenia, yarrow, blackberries.  The iris and peonies are winding down.  Two big flower stalks are coming up from the yucca plants in the white garden.

let's put this in order

May. 22nd, 2017 11:02 am
solarbird: (tracer)
[personal profile] solarbird
If you wanted to follow on overcoming the fear of spiders in chronological order - it is kind of futile. But here is a list. I probably won't update this post, but it is correct as of today. (Okay I updated it, it's now correct as of 24 May 2017.)

I am including only chapters already written. I am redacting titles of chapters not yet published. Chapters numbered ???## have probable numbers but they aren't final. Chapters ??? can't have usable numbers yet, as they will appear after others not yet written.

I consider the second movement, "Restored," to be two related mini-movements, but there is only one name, so they are combined here.

Some people would consider this spoilery (if nothing else, because of movement titles), so enjoy a cut tag.

It's 2068, and Overwatch test pilot Lena Oxton has just been given the go code, ten thousand metres above Greece. )
solarbird: (tracer)
[personal profile] solarbird

"Ah'm not sure that was the best idea," the cowboy said, from Arizona, in North America, "just lettin' her waltz out like that."

The hacker nodded, from an unknown location, probably further south, but not necessarily. "I know. Amélie has been acting very strange lately. All emotional. When she first started this project, I caught hints of it and thought, 'that'll be useful someday,' but now, it's just splashing around everywhere."

"Hasn't affected her aim any, has it?"

Sombra snickered, and popped some obscenely hot bit of candy into her mouth. "Made it better, maybe. She's always been obsessive about targeting, but since Oxton showed up, it's even worse. She hits targets I can't even see."

"Means she's nervous. Did the same thing in '71."

"We were all very nervous in '71," the hacker shuddered. 2071 had not been a good year for anyone interested in not having another Omnic War.

"Yeah, but she's the only one whose aim improved." He leaned back in his chair and flipped pistols around, nervously practicing spin tricks, before turning back to the conversation. "We're dancin' 'round the point - what're we gonna do if Tracer spills the beans?"

"Oh, is that what you meant?" said the hacker, looking back at the screen. "I thought you were worried about the spider."

"I'm worried about the organisation. You keepin' an eye on Oxton?"

Sombra laughed and slid a display over. "You see this? This is a livestream of MI5's tracking feed. I'm not watching her so much as I'm watching them watch her."

The cowboy smiled and chucked. "Well, then. At least we'll know."

"I'm not worried about Lena giving us up - I don't know if she knows it, but she's tooootally in love with Amélie. It's a little scary."

"I'll take yer word on the love part, but you sure 'bout that not talkin' part? 'Cause I sure as hell ain't."

Sombra smirked, knowingly. "I've kept you in the loop, but you weren't there, and I was. Trust me, she won't talk."

"And if they make 'er?"

"Even if they put her under a deep probe, all she knows is a little house and a couple of labs, and they're scrubbed now anyway. It looks like a tourist rental. I made a nice little lease history and everything."

"If you say so," he said, dubiously.

"I even made a rental listing," she told the sharpshooter. "I can show you. It's in all the archives since last year, as of, oh, a week ago."

He waved one hand dismissively. "Yer good, ah hear ya."

"Me," she said, sending the links anyway, "I'm not so worried about what happens to our little teleporting pilot. What I am worried about is what happens to Amélie if they decide to take her lover apart."

"Gérard all over again, you mean? It's that bad?" he said, pronouncing it almost correctly, but still a bit like 'Gerald.' "That was hard on 'er, I gotta admit."

"Worse."

"Hard t'get worse than that," said the cowboy.

"Worse," emphasised the hacker, darkly. "I think they'd be lucky if they still had a government the next day."

[syndicated profile] alpennia_feed

Posted by Heather Rose Jones

Monday, May 22, 2017 - 07:00

By delightful coincidence Claudie Arseneault's book Viral Airwaves is not only a November 2016 release (for the 2nd edition) but will be on sale this week. Check Claudie's blog for details.

Henry Schmitt wants nothing more than a quiet life and a daily ration of instant noodles. At least until he learns the terrible secret that drove his father away—the Plague that killed his mother and ravaged his country was created by those now in power. He has one chance to help expose the conspiracy: a ragtag band of rebels needs a pilot for their hot air balloon, where they can launch a broadcast revealing the truth. If Henry accepts, he can experience his dream of flight. But he would have to leave his safe, tranquil life behind … and bring the wrath of a corrupt government upon his head.


I'm always delighted when I have an opportunity to promote the work of writers who are also fans of the Alpennia books. Claudie featured the series several month ago in her occasional twitter series #indiemanche (it's a bilingual pun) that promotes the work of indie authors and creators. She has also created a database for science fiction and fantasy with characters on the asexual and aromantic spectrums.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that--like the third Alpennia novel, Mother of Souls--may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

Major category: 
hrj: (Default)
[personal profile] hrj

By delightful coincidence Claudie Arseneault's book Viral Airwaves is not only a November 2016 release (for the 2nd edition) but will be on sale this week. Check Claudie's blog for details.

Henry Schmitt wants nothing more than a quiet life and a daily ration of instant noodles. At least until he learns the terrible secret that drove his father away—the Plague that killed his mother and ravaged his country was created by those now in power. He has one chance to help expose the conspiracy: a ragtag band of rebels needs a pilot for their hot air balloon, where they can launch a broadcast revealing the truth. If Henry accepts, he can experience his dream of flight. But he would have to leave his safe, tranquil life behind … and bring the wrath of a corrupt government upon his head.


I'm always delighted when I have an opportunity to promote the work of writers who are also fans of the Alpennia books. Claudie featured the series several month ago in her occasional twitter series #indiemanche (it's a bilingual pun) that promotes the work of indie authors and creators. She has also created a database for science fiction and fantasy with characters on the asexual and aromantic spectrums.

The Great November Book Release Re-Boot is a blog series talking about November 2016 releases that--like the third Alpennia novel, Mother of Souls--may have been overshadowed by unfortunate political events.

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