2018-10-08

mdlbear: (technonerdmonster)

(This will be something of an experiment. The original was written in markdown and posted on Computer-Curmudgeon.com. We'll see whether the process made a hash of it. I may have to do some cleaning up.

This post is about Hyperviewer, an update of a very old demo program of mine from 1988 that displays wireframe objects rotating in hyperspace. (Actually, anywhere between four and six dimensions.) Since this is 2018, I naturally decided to write it in JavaScript, using Inferno and SVG, and put it on the web. It was a learning experience, in more ways than one.

Getting started

I had been doing a little work with React, which is pretty good an very popular, and had recently read about Inferno, which is a lighter-weight, faster framework that's almost completely interchangeable with React. Sounded good, especially since I wanted high performance for something that's going to be doing thousands of floating-point matrix multiplies per second. (A hypercube in N dimensions has 2^N vertices, and a rotation matrix has N^2 entries -- do the math). (It turns out I really didn't have to worry -- Moore's Law over three decades gives a speedup by a factor of a million, give or take a few orders of magnitude, so even using an partially-interpreted language speed isn't a problem. Perhaps I'm showing my age.)

To keep things simple -- and make it possible to eventually save pictures -- I decided to use SVG: the web standard for Scalable Vector Graphics, rather than trying to draw them out using an HTML5 Canvas tag. It's a perfect match for something that's nothing but a bunch of vectors. SVG is XML-based, and you can simply drop it into the middle of an HTML page. SVG is also really easy to generate using the new JSX format, which is basically XML tags embedded in a JavaScript file.

Modern JavaScript uses a program called a "transpiler" -- the most common one is Babel -- that compiles shiny new JavaScript constructs (and even some new languages like TypeScript and CoffeeScript, which I want to learn soon) into the kind of plain old JavaScript that almost any browser can understand. (There are still some people using Microsoft Exploiter from the turn of the century millennium; if you're reading this blog it's safe for me to assume that you aren't one of them.)

Anyway, let's get started:

cut tag added to protect your sanity )

(Not too bad of a formatting job, though of course the color didn't come through. Cut tag added because it's over 2000 words.)

Another fine post from The Computer Curmudgeon.
Cross-posted on computer-curmudgeon.com

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